bird marketing – Budgies Paradise http://budgies-paradise.com/ Mon, 20 Sep 2021 01:58:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://budgies-paradise.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-41-150x150.png bird marketing – Budgies Paradise http://budgies-paradise.com/ 32 32 Nature’s needs and human desires vie for space among Rhode Island’s protected places – ecoRI News https://budgies-paradise.com/natures-needs-and-human-desires-vie-for-space-among-rhode-islands-protected-places-ecori-news/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 12:49:13 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/natures-needs-and-human-desires-vie-for-space-among-rhode-islands-protected-places-ecori-news/ Charlie Vandemoer, director of the Rhode Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex, which includes the state’s five federal refuges, said USFWS properties are managed primarily for the conservation of fish and wildlife, as public recreation are secondary. Mountain bikes and bicycles are prohibited. He said hunting, especially deer so that they do not devour native plantations, […]]]>


Charlie Vandemoer, director of the Rhode Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex, which includes the state’s five federal refuges, said USFWS properties are managed primarily for the conservation of fish and wildlife, as public recreation are secondary. Mountain bikes and bicycles are prohibited. He said hunting, especially deer so that they do not devour native plantations, is part of the management strategy.

State and federal officials have said early successional habitat is needed to help stem the decline of scrub-dependent wildlife like the New England rabbit and woodcock.

According to the USFWS, scrub and young forest habitats in the northeast have declined dramatically over the past century, mainly due to declining agricultural land use, development pressures, and infilling of wetlands. .

The federal agency has identified early successional habitat as a high priority for conservation. One of these plans is the Grand Fourré National Wildlife Refuge. The 10 shelters in six states – Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Maine, New Hampshire and New York – would acquire up to 15,000 private acres through various methods, including conservation easements and donations.

Although the acquisition plan has been approved, no land has yet been secured, according to Vandemoer. Hunting and fishing would be permitted in the proposed Great Thicket National Wildlife Area.

Vandemoer noted that the fees collected on the sale of hunting and fishing licenses, tags, stamps and permits and the taxes generated by the sale of related goods are the main source of funding for most of the state’s wildlife conservation efforts, including those in Rhode Island.

Last year, Rhode Island’s five USFWS shelters welcomed a record 643,000 visitors – a figure Vandemoer attributes to the pandemic, as properties are seeing a similar rate of visitors this year. Of those visitors in 2020, he said, only 316 were there to hunt.

“It is a challenge to provide as much recreation as possible while achieving our goals, which are the conservation of fish and wildlife,” said Vandemoer.

Hunting, however, is not the only point of contention among those who visit wildlife refuges, reserves and other public spaces protected from development.

The underlying problem leading to most user disputes is the state’s population density – just behind New Jersey – and the lack of open space available to meet the needs of all users. No matter what nature needs.

The range of uses permitted on protected lands may differ from property to property. Change is inevitable, angst is inevitable, disagreements are common, and bad behavior is a problem.

Rhode Island’s collection of public protected areas – a patchwork of land owned by taxpayers and nonprofits – is used by hunters with guns and bows, fishermen, photographers, bird watchers , walkers, hikers, joggers, mountain bikers, mushroom hunters, picnickers, horse riders, swimmers, dog walkers, climbers and all terrain riders.

Dogs left on a leash disturb ground-nesting birds, and the silent meditation is interrupted by the roar of ATVs. Careless visitors leave garbage and animal waste behind, and the illegal dumping of garbage, appliances, furniture and construction debris leaves scars.

Conflict of use, however, is only one aspect of the management problem. Rhode Island’s protected areas are more than just human playgrounds. They are home to flora and fauna and provide invaluable ecosystem services such as stormwater management, carbon sequestration, nutrient cycling, and water and air purification.



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Year 3 is “the greatest” and “the best” yet for Progressive’s advertising campaign with Baker Mayfield https://budgies-paradise.com/year-3-is-the-greatest-and-the-best-yet-for-progressives-advertising-campaign-with-baker-mayfield/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/year-3-is-the-greatest-and-the-best-yet-for-progressives-advertising-campaign-with-baker-mayfield/ Jeff Charney, to the surprise of some of his colleagues, helped a Boston company he worked in land Larry Bird for an advertising campaign in the mid-1980s. It was quite an accomplishment for a young college graduate. Bird, who didn’t seem very keen to speak in the commercial, was asked to take 26 shots for […]]]>


Jeff Charney, to the surprise of some of his colleagues, helped a Boston company he worked in land Larry Bird for an advertising campaign in the mid-1980s.

It was quite an accomplishment for a young college graduate.

Bird, who didn’t seem very keen to speak in the commercial, was asked to take 26 shots for a campaign whose slogan was “quality starts with the fundamentals”.

The big Boston Celtics, according to Charney, said, “Hey kid, if I hit all 26 hits in a row so you don’t have to edit, can I go?”

Charney and his team took the bet, and Bird – on a second double down or nothing – didn’t miss.

“He literally dropped the microphone and walked away,” Charney said.

Charney, now in his 11th year as Marketing Director of Progressive, learned a valuable lesson that day.

“Since then I’ve said, ‘I have to have an insurance policy. I have to make sure that these people can improvise, that these people will cover me.’ “

Charney has made a name for himself in insurance marketing, first as Marketing Director at Aflac, then at Progressive, where he oversees what he calls a “network” of characters that includes the long-time star. date Flo (played by Stephanie Courtney) and a more recent phenomenon, Dr. Rick (played by Bill Glass).

Baker Mayfield, unlike many of his progressive business counterparts, did not hone his acting skills by doing improv comedy. But the 26-year-old Cleveland Browns quarterback, like everyone else in the insurance giant’s marketing machine, is quick.

For Charney, the first pick in the 2018 NFL Draft was a far different bet than his former employer had made with Bird over 35 years earlier.

“Baker, we took a bet,” said the progressive CMO of the quarterback, who was chosen after the insurer subjected the 2017 Heisman Trophy winner to a “creative combination” at his Mayfield campus. Town.

More than two years later, Progressive is delighted with its choice.

“At Home with Baker Mayfield,” a campaign built around the quarterback and his wife, Emily, living owner moments – only “home” is FirstEnergy Stadium – kicked off its third season earlier this month – here, coinciding, as usual, with the NFL kickoff.

Charney said it was the “biggest” and best year to date, comparing “At Home” with popular shows that hit their stride in Year 3, once the characters were established and the public became hungry for more.



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College in Upper Assam rainforests breeds several young environmentalists https://budgies-paradise.com/college-in-upper-assam-rainforests-breeds-several-young-environmentalists/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 07:31:09 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/college-in-upper-assam-rainforests-breeds-several-young-environmentalists/ A deer frantically hurtled down a hilly slope, trying to get ahead of its invisible predator. The predator – a majestic Royal Bengal tiger – followed moments later, only to disappear in a flash in the same bushes. This pursuit did not take place in a thick and wooded jungle, but on the campuses of […]]]>


A deer frantically hurtled down a hilly slope, trying to get ahead of its invisible predator. The predator – a majestic Royal Bengal tiger – followed moments later, only to disappear in a flash in the same bushes.

This pursuit did not take place in a thick and wooded jungle, but on the campuses of a college in Haut-Assam.

Welcome to Digboi College, located in the eponymous oil town, which is located right in the Indo-Burmese hotspot rich in biodiversity.

The incident happened 12 years ago, but Bhaben Das, a guard at the college, remembers it like it was yesterday.

“Until then, I was sitting outside. After seeing the tiger, I remember walking into the house and locking the grill, ”he recalls.

A long-tailed broadbill seen on campus. (Photo credit: Deborshee Gogoi)

India has many educational campuses rich in biodiversity: from the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bengaluru to the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Mumbai, which is home to a multitude of wild animals.

Digboi College, however, is more than that. It shares its border with the Upper Dihing Elephant Reserve and is just 22 km from the recently notified Dehing Patkai National Park. Another forest is even closer: the Soraipung range under Digboi Forest Division, one of the entry points to the national park, is barely 6 km from the college.

Rajib Rudra Tariang, who heads the college’s zoology department, explained the vastness of the wildlife spotted on campus over the years: “We have identified 19 species of mammals, 180 species of birds, 33 species of snakes, 12 species of lizards, 167 species of butterflies, seven species of frogs, over 300 species of moths and several other species of insects and spiders, ”he said.

Digboi College is home to over 100 species of butterflies. Pictured is the ‘Paris Peacock’. (Photo credit: Deborshee Gogoi)

A wild and wild campus

The richness of diversity on campus is not lost on the students and teachers of the college. The greenery of the campus has created a whole crop of environmentally conscious young people.

College students actively participated in the 2020 “I-am-Dihing-Patkai” virtual campaign, a widespread movement in the state to protest illegal charcoal mining in the Dihing Patkai Reserve Forest.

It might be hard not to worry about this given the ecological richness of the college’s location. As ornithologist and cartoonist Deborshee Gogoi, who teaches marketing in the university’s business department, said, “In 2012, an artificial orchard was created especially for the animals on campus. Barking deer calved inside the campus. Herds of elephants visit the campus in winter. Once, a deer head was dropped near the college cycle stand by a leopard.

Library assistant Heramba Patgiri, who joined the college in 1984 and is currently the oldest member of staff, recalled seeing packs of dhole (wild dogs) and wild boars inside the campus more early.

A deer barking in the college fruit garden. (Photo credit: Deborshee Gogoi)

The college is also a gold mine for bird watchers. “Some extremely rare birds like the chestnut-backed thrush and the rusty-bellied short wing are found on our campus,” Gogoi said. It was also on the route of American ornithologist Noah Stryker, who set a world record in 2015 by spotting 6,042 birds of the 10,400 estimated species in the world, on a non-stop journey across seven continents.

Green warriors

Tariang, who has been teaching at Digboi College since 2008, is an expert snake catcher. He makes sure no one in the area kills them. Whenever a snake is spotted, he and his assistants – students and teachers at the college that Tariang has trained over the years – take care of it. “Every year a few students in my department learn to catch snakes,” he said. Due to his heart problems, Tariang said he had started to delegate most of the work to the younger generation. “Today, I only accept 20% of the calls I receive. However, I have trained 10 to 12 young people who replace me.

Digboi College’s unique location attracts many students. Niranjan Nayak, a graduate student from the zoology department, said: “I have been interested in wildlife since childhood. I was educated at Jawahar Navodaya Vidyalaya in Tinsukia, where my art teacher suggested that I try to get admitted to this college. Now I think it was the best decision of my life.

Sumit Das, a final-year botany student at the college, echoed Nayak. “My attraction to my botanical subject grew at this college, as I was able to observe first-hand an incredible biodiversity.”

Students from the Department of Commerce install bird nests on trees for World Sparrow Day. (Photo credit: Deborshee Gogoi)

He added: “Here we have trees like Hollong, Kadam, Nahar, Indian Rain Tree, Ajar, Deodar, Arjuna, Tree Fern, Magnolia, bamboo species, orchids, climbers, etc.”

The college’s National Service Scheme (NSS) unit adopted the forest village of Soraipung, which is home to 86 families. Villagers were trained in solid waste management, that is, converting solid waste into organic fertilizer. “We also trained young people from the village to become bird guides,” Tariang said.

The Digboi College Environmental Cell has also undertaken a project to identify the habitats of the Assam state animal, the white-winged wood duck in and around Digboi, a project in which Gogoi is the principal investigator.

As Das, the botany student, put it, “The greenery of Digboi College reaped the seed of environmental awareness in my mind.

The writer is a freelance journalist in Assam and tweets at nabarun_guha45.





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Lights, camera, action in the Ottawa Valley! Last movie ends in Arnprior and Pembroke https://budgies-paradise.com/lights-camera-action-in-the-ottawa-valley-last-movie-ends-in-arnprior-and-pembroke/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 22:01:11 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/lights-camera-action-in-the-ottawa-valley-last-movie-ends-in-arnprior-and-pembroke/ ARNPRIER, ONT. – From the Hollywood Hills to the Ottawa Valley, top directors travel to rural communities west of the capital, which means the next movie you watch could have been shot in your backyard. Originally from Ottawa but now living in Los Angeles, director Brian Lutes is back in the valley this summer for […]]]>


ARNPRIER, ONT. – From the Hollywood Hills to the Ottawa Valley, top directors travel to rural communities west of the capital, which means the next movie you watch could have been shot in your backyard.

Originally from Ottawa but now living in Los Angeles, director Brian Lutes is back in the valley this summer for the set of his latest film, Painted Sharks, a story set in the late 1970s about a woman and her child. seeking refuge from a troubled and abusive relationship. .

“There is definitely a distinct flavor here, it just has that old school charm,” Lutes told CTV News Ottawa. “We shot most of our indoor scenes in Arnprior and most of the outdoor scenes, the neighborhood scenes in Pembroke.”

Saturday is the last day of filming for Painted Sharks, and Lutes wraps up his final scenes at a disused Smiths Falls hospital. He says that after working for so long in the United States, hospitality is one of the many reasons, besides the value of the dollar, that filmmakers have chosen to shoot in Canada.

“Canadians are a lot easier to get along with than Americans. When I shoot something in the United States, there are people who come out of their homes with shotguns who turn the bird towards the camera,” Lutes admits. . “But in Canada we call extras and you have 200, maybe 500 people raising their hands.”

One of those people is Anna Mary Burke Grattan, a resident of Pembroke. She received a knock on the front door of her Victorian home in April, where a scout asked if she would like to be a part of the film.

“She asked me if I thought we would be interested in participating in a movie because we have century-old houses with porches and it’s a very old neighborhood with mature trees,” says Grattan, who helped with the film as a production assistant since.

“And I love to be involved in the whole set,” Grattan continues, “I actually did come in the movie as well as my husband and some of the neighbors, so it was really, really good.”

Over the past year, the valley has also hosted two shoots of Mel Gibson films, titled Fatman and Bandit. Many Hallmark and Christmas movies were also shot on the streets of downtown Arnprior.

“You have the beautiful streetscape, but also the historic buildings which provide a beautiful and picturesque downtown setting for many typical Hallmark films,” says Lindsay Wilson, Marketing and Business Development Manager at Arnprior. “I think the residents really enjoy seeing the end results, and it’s great to watch movies and see places you know well.”

“When you’re in a big city like Ottawa or Toronto, everything is new and shiny,” says Lutes, who enjoys shooting his films in historic settings. “But to get this Norman Rockwell painting, you’re going to always find it in Arnprior, Pembroke, and Petawawa.”

Lutes is hoping Painted Sharks will be finished by spring, with the goal of Netflix resuming production.



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Baraboo Crane Factory Celebrates Crane Safeguard Day with a New Look https://budgies-paradise.com/baraboo-crane-factory-celebrates-crane-safeguard-day-with-a-new-look/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 21:40:00 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/baraboo-crane-factory-celebrates-crane-safeguard-day-with-a-new-look/ September 18, 2021 4:40 PM Posted: September 18, 2021 4:40 p.m. Update: September 19, 2021 9:34 AM BARABOO, Wisconsin – September 18 is Crane Conservation Day in Wisconsin, and a group of “craniacs” in Baraboo are celebrating birds today with a new look. The International Saving Cranes Foundation was founded in 1973, and over the […]]]>


BARABOO, Wisconsin – September 18 is Crane Conservation Day in Wisconsin, and a group of “craniacs” in Baraboo are celebrating birds today with a new look.

The International Saving Cranes Foundation was founded in 1973, and over the past 48 years employees and members have dedicated their time to preserving the fifteen species of cranes, eleven of which are endangered.

The foundation closed its doors in 2018 for a ten million dollar facelift, thanks to many donors. The additions made have allowed the Foundation to add wetlands to all of their crane enclosures, as well as update signage for visitors.

“One of the reasons we wanted to do the renovation was to make sure these cranes are so happy,” said Pamela Seelman, Marketing and Communications Coordinator.

The happiness and well-being of the cranes is a top priority at the facility, which is home to around 120 birds, according to COO Kim Smith.

“There isn’t a single crane here that doesn’t have our focus and hard work to make sure they’re there for future generations,” Smith said.

After three years of renovations and another year of pandemic, they finally reopened the crane exhibits, celebrating Wisconsin Crane Day and their new homes.

The cranes attract approximately 20,000 visitors per year during a typical season from May 1 to October 31. According to Anne Lacy, senior director of the facility’s North American Bird Program, it kind of helps them defend themselves.

“We use cranes as ambassadors,” Lacy said. “When you know something and you care about something, you care about where they live and why they live there”



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neighborhood needs an outside look | Editorials https://budgies-paradise.com/neighborhood-needs-an-outside-look-editorials/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 04:55:00 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/neighborhood-needs-an-outside-look-editorials/ When it comes to a new community engagement process, the St. Joseph School District has a tough needle to thread. The public does not trust the administration or the Board of Education, a fact that becomes evident when incumbents are rejected or when bond proposals lose a lot at the ballot box. There is a […]]]>


When it comes to a new community engagement process, the St. Joseph School District has a tough needle to thread.

The public does not trust the administration or the Board of Education, a fact that becomes evident when incumbents are rejected or when bond proposals lose a lot at the ballot box.

There is a huge need for an outside entity to step in, to see the big picture and to reach consensus. Given that two external entities are funding this engagement initiative, it seems the only rational reason not to move forward would be to accept the status quo.

The current state of our schools is not acceptable. This is not a blow to the teachers. People love their teachers, and those we interviewed have impressed and inspired us.

Currently, Missouri has seven school districts with provisional accreditation, the closest being Kansas City, Hickman Mills, and Gilman City. Saint Joseph is one of 510 fully accredited districts, a group so large that it means little to the general public.

If you choose a marketing campaign, “There are seven that are worse than us” is not the one you would choose. Those considering a move to Saint-Joseph will check out reviews on real estate websites, where the ratings are sometimes less than flattering. One site gave two out of 10 to Benton High School, four of 10 to Lafayette and six of 10 to Central.

“I wish I could put them in a new school,” one commentator said.

Just one number may seem unfair, but those who have lived elsewhere and have a different expectation of school quality are clearly bewildered by what they see here. Those who live in Saint-Joseph should understand this.

If the community engagement campaign can take St. Joseph in a new direction, then this effort deserves public support. The district needs to disengage from the bigger picture without handing over the keys to day-to-day operations or allowing facilitation meetings to function without full transparency.

The district’s facilities planning committee is now on hiatus, a decision that makes sense as it would overlap with the new engagement process. An academic planning committee is also on hold, a decision that at first glance is more difficult to understand, but perhaps it is a nod to the fact that it will take more than new buildings to improve schools.

These are details to be worked out as the process unfolds, not a reason to block community engagement in the first place. Board member Ken Reeder said he opposed the engagement efforts and the outcome seemed “predetermined.”

But in coming to that conclusion now, isn’t Reeder making his own predetermined judgment? Unless you’re happy with the situation, community engagement deserves a chance.



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Online thrift store Tradesy raises $ 67 million https://budgies-paradise.com/online-thrift-store-tradesy-raises-67-million/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 23:13:44 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/online-thrift-store-tradesy-raises-67-million/ Tracy DiNunzio wants to kill fast fashion. Founder and CEO of Santa Monica-based Tradesy, DiNunzio said that over the past decade, consumers have recognized the detrimental effects of fast, cheap and fast fashion on the global climate. She argues that in addition to being environmentally conscious, buying and reselling high-end fashion items can also be […]]]>


Tracy DiNunzio wants to kill fast fashion.

Founder and CEO of Santa Monica-based Tradesy, DiNunzio said that over the past decade, consumers have recognized the detrimental effects of fast, cheap and fast fashion on the global climate. She argues that in addition to being environmentally conscious, buying and reselling high-end fashion items can also be affordable.


“We’ve always focused on luxury and it’s not because we love Louis Vuitton bags,” DiNunzio said, referring to the site’s most popular item. “We chose luxury because they are the most durable goods that exist and the demand is the highest and the most resilient.”

Investors adhere to this mission.

Tradesy recently raised $ 67 million in a Series D funding round led by Foris Ventures. Since its inception in 2009, the company has raised $ 149 million. DiNunzio did not disclose the valuation of the company.

The global second-hand luxury market experienced “strong growth” from 2015 to 2020, and market research firm IMARC Group expects the market to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 10.3% over the next five years.

While some may dismiss luxury items as reserved for the wealthy, DiNunzio said an early marketing analysis the company conducted showed the average household income for a Tradesy customer to be $ 65,000.

There are other advantages, she said, noting that luxury goods tend to retain their value. For example, a consumer can buy a bag for $ 500, keep it for a year, and then sell it for roughly the same price a year later.

“We are finding that customers who might have thought luxury was out of reach are turning to resale and embracing resale,” she said. “Everyone wants better quality things and it’s just a matter of affording them.”

With the cash injection, Tradesy hired a new COO, Amy Gershkoff Bolles, who led the global data science team at eBay.

The company will also continue to develop artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies so that the resale experience can be “seamless” for buyers and sellers and to create a “personalized and organized” experience for buyers, a said DiNunzio.

It will also begin to invest more heavily in marketing, having relied primarily on organic growth in the past.

The market for low-end second-hand clothing is also booming.

thredUp, an online consignment and thrift store, went public earlier this year with a market cap of $ 1.3 billion. Etsy acquired Depop, a fashion resale market targeted for Gen Z, this summer for $ 1.6 billion, mostly in cash.

DiNunzio said that Tradesy sets itself apart from its competition because it is a peer-to-peer platform, so the company has no inventory and luxury items have a high average order value. Sellers need a 19.8% commission. They also authenticate online, eliminating the need for shipping.

“It’s pretty much the cheapest and least impactful way for people to get a new order when they want it,” she said.

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KL Bird Park is ready to take off again https://budgies-paradise.com/kl-bird-park-is-ready-to-take-off-again/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 23:44:06 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/kl-bird-park-is-ready-to-take-off-again/ Nestled within the lush gardens of Perdana Botanical Gardens is KL Bird Park, a unique attraction located close to downtown Kuala Lumpur. Billed as the largest walk-in aviary in the world, it was designed to give visitors the opportunity to observe birds up close, in a semi-natural environment. The park was officially opened on February […]]]>


Nestled within the lush gardens of Perdana Botanical Gardens is KL Bird Park, a unique attraction located close to downtown Kuala Lumpur.

Billed as the largest walk-in aviary in the world, it was designed to give visitors the opportunity to observe birds up close, in a semi-natural environment.

The park was officially opened on February 10, 1991 and first managed by the Kuala Lumpur City Hall (DBKL).

“Safari Bird Park and Wonderland Sdn Bhd took over its management in 2000, and operates both KL Bird Park and Hornbill Restaurant and Cafe,” said Taufik Mohd Sharif, director of marketing and promotions for the company, adding that DBKL was still the landowner.

The park is divided into four zones and has over 3,000 birds comprising 200 local and foreign species.

Visitors taking photos with a beautiful peacock.

Highlights include Hornbill Park which is home to the great hornbill, the Asian black hornbill and the Sarawak state bird, the rhinoceros hornbill; Free Flying Bird Zone where storks, egrets, ibises and peacocks mingle freely; as well as World Of Parrots where visitors can see these colorful creatures up close.

The education center and bird school were added to the three-decade-old park later. They allow visitors to learn more about Malaysian birds and their life cycle (and see hatches live if they’re lucky) as well as understand the relationship between birds and humans.

“We have a curator and a veterinarian on site who work together to manage and care for the birds,” Taufik said.

“The curator manages and takes an inventory of the birds. His duty includes daily checks to monitor their number and condition.

“The vet takes care of the health of the birds. Some birds are tagged to monitor their health and other concerns. “

Capture memorable moments at KL Bird Park by snapping photos with some of the most colorful parrots, cockatoos, conures and macaws at a dedicated booth.Capture memorable moments at KL Bird Park by snapping photos with some of the most colorful parrots, cockatoos, conures and macaws at a dedicated booth.

In the rare event that a bird escapes the park, he said employees will be dispatched to find and catch it.

“Before the Covid-19 pandemic, visitors to the park included 70% foreigners and 30% locals, most of whom reside outside of the Klang Valley.

“With travel restrictions and closed international borders, visitors are now 99% Malaysians and 1% expats or long-term foreigners in Malaysia.

“When interstate travel was authorized during the recovery movement control order last year, the ratio of local visitors from Klang Valley and other states was around 50:50” , he added.

Taufik said the Covid-19 pandemic and the drop in the number of tourists had impacted the costs of operating the bird park.

“Her income comes from the sale of tickets, souvenirs and food and drink kiosks. The restaurant is run as a separate business.

The pandemic and the decline in tourists have had an impact on the park's operating costs, Taufik explains.The pandemic and the decline in tourists have had an impact on the park’s operating costs, Taufik explains.

“When it comes to visitors, we’re only getting half the number compared to the days before Covid-19.

“To solve this problem, management had to reduce the use of non-essential operations, such as shutting down air conditioners in the education center (during periods of restricted movement when no visitors were allowed),” he said, adding that the park has also had to cut part-time and contract staff.

The park reopened on September 10 when restrictions were lifted after Kuala Lumpur moved to phase two of the national stimulus package.

Taufik urged visitors to continue to ensure adherence to standard operating procedures.

“We invite the public to visit and support local tourism. But they must be responsible tourists.

“People tend to forget about physical distance when taking pictures or watching the bird show.

“They are also not allowed to take anything out of the park for hygienic reasons, even if they find a feather fallen on the ground,” he said.

There are several species of owls in the KL Bird Park, although these nocturnal creatures likely sleep during the day.There are several species of owls in the KL Bird Park, although these nocturnal creatures likely sleep during the day.

He pointed out that the ticket purchasing process has been made as transparent as possible to reduce congestion.

Lana Ishika Shashinathan and her family were among those who had a fun day at the park on a weekday when it was open in March.

“I liked the parrots because they can talk! I hope I have an orange parrot as a pet, ”the five-year-old said. Her parents, Shashinathan Selvanathan, 41, and Shivani Vijayakumar, 36, said the outing was a reward for Lana Ishika for her good performance in kindergarten.

“We gave her the opportunity to explore other attractions and she chose the bird park because of her fascination with nature.

“This is the first time we’ve been here and we never realized it was so big,” Shashinathan said, adding that they were impressed with the attraction and how clean it was.

Some of the activities that park visitors can attend are the bird feeding sessions held in various areas as well as the bird show at the amphitheater.

Storks, egrets and ibis eagerly await their meal at mealtime.Storks, egrets and ibis eagerly await their meal at mealtime.

These take place at specific times, so visitors wishing to attend the sessions are advised to plan their visits accordingly.

A full-day photoshoot with some of the most colorful parrots, cockatoos, conures and macaws is also available in a dedicated photo booth.

The entire site is accessible to wheelchairs and strollers, with the exception of its amphitheater.

Entrance to the park is restricted to people who have been fully vaccinated and have a low risk status. Children are allowed in if accompanied by fully immunized parents.

The admission fee for Malaysians with MyKad is RM 25 per adult and RM 12 per child / senior. Entrance is free for people with disabilities.

Entrance to the park, when it is allowed to open, is restricted to fully vaccinated people.

* KL Bird Park is temporarily closed as part of phase two of the national recovery plan, in accordance with directives from the National Security Council. For more details, visit www.klbirdpark.com.



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KL Bird Park is ready to take off again https://budgies-paradise.com/kl-bird-park-is-ready-to-take-off-again-2/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 23:44:06 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/kl-bird-park-is-ready-to-take-off-again-2/ Nestled within the lush gardens of Perdana Botanical Gardens is KL Bird Park, a unique attraction located close to downtown Kuala Lumpur. Billed as the largest walk-in aviary in the world, it was designed to give visitors the opportunity to observe birds up close, in a semi-natural environment. The park was officially opened on February […]]]>


Nestled within the lush gardens of Perdana Botanical Gardens is KL Bird Park, a unique attraction located close to downtown Kuala Lumpur.

Billed as the largest walk-in aviary in the world, it was designed to give visitors the opportunity to observe birds up close, in a semi-natural environment.

The park was officially opened on February 10, 1991 and first managed by the Kuala Lumpur City Hall (DBKL).

“Safari Bird Park and Wonderland Sdn Bhd took over its management in 2000, and operates both KL Bird Park and Hornbill Restaurant and Cafe,” said Taufik Mohd Sharif, director of marketing and promotions for the company, adding that DBKL was still the landowner.

The park is divided into four zones and has over 3,000 birds comprising 200 local and foreign species.

Visitors taking photos with a beautiful peacock.

Highlights include Hornbill Park which is home to the great hornbill, the Asian black hornbill and the Sarawak state bird, the rhinoceros hornbill; Free Flying Bird Zone where storks, egrets, ibises and peacocks mingle freely; as well as World Of Parrots where visitors can see these colorful creatures up close.

The education center and bird school were added to the three-decade-old park later. They allow visitors to learn more about Malaysian birds and their life cycle (and see hatches live if they’re lucky) as well as understand the relationship between birds and humans.

“We have a curator and a veterinarian on site who work together to manage and care for the birds,” Taufik said.

“The curator manages and takes an inventory of the birds. His duty includes daily checks to monitor their number and condition.

“The vet takes care of the health of the birds. Some birds are tagged to monitor their health and other concerns. “

Capture memorable moments at KL Bird Park by snapping photos with some of the most colorful parrots, cockatoos, conures and macaws at a dedicated booth.Capture memorable moments at KL Bird Park by snapping photos with some of the most colorful parrots, cockatoos, conures and macaws at a dedicated booth.

In the rare event that a bird escapes the park, he said employees will be dispatched to find and catch it.

“Before the Covid-19 pandemic, visitors to the park included 70% foreigners and 30% locals, most of whom reside outside of the Klang Valley.

“With travel restrictions and closed international borders, visitors are now 99% Malaysians and 1% expats or long-term foreigners in Malaysia.

“When interstate travel was authorized during the recovery movement control order last year, the ratio of local visitors from Klang Valley and other states was around 50:50” , he added.

Taufik said the Covid-19 pandemic and the drop in the number of tourists had impacted the costs of operating the bird park.

“Her income comes from the sale of tickets, souvenirs and food and drink kiosks. The restaurant is run as a separate business.

The pandemic and the decline in tourists have had an impact on the park's operating costs, Taufik explains.The pandemic and the decline in tourists have had an impact on the park’s operating costs, Taufik explains.

“When it comes to visitors, we’re only getting half the number compared to the days before Covid-19.

“To solve this problem, management had to reduce the use of non-essential operations, such as shutting down air conditioners in the education center (during periods of restricted movement when no visitors were allowed),” he said, adding that the park has also had to cut part-time and contract staff.

The park reopened on September 10 when restrictions were lifted after Kuala Lumpur moved to phase two of the national stimulus package.

Taufik urged visitors to continue to ensure adherence to standard operating procedures.

“We invite the public to visit and support local tourism. But they must be responsible tourists.

“People tend to forget about physical distance when taking pictures or watching the bird show.

“They are also not allowed to take anything out of the park for hygienic reasons, even if they find a feather fallen on the ground,” he said.

There are several species of owls in the KL Bird Park, although these nocturnal creatures likely sleep during the day.There are several species of owls in the KL Bird Park, although these nocturnal creatures likely sleep during the day.

He pointed out that the ticket purchasing process has been made as transparent as possible to reduce congestion.

Lana Ishika Shashinathan and her family were among those who had a fun day at the park on a weekday when it was open in March.

“I liked the parrots because they can talk! I hope I have an orange parrot as a pet, ”the five-year-old said. Her parents, Shashinathan Selvanathan, 41, and Shivani Vijayakumar, 36, said the outing was a reward for Lana Ishika for her good performance in kindergarten.

“We gave her the opportunity to explore other attractions and she chose the bird park because of her fascination with nature.

“This is the first time we’ve been here and we never realized it was so big,” Shashinathan said, adding that they were impressed with the attraction and how clean it was.

Some of the activities that park visitors can attend are the bird feeding sessions held in various areas as well as the bird show at the amphitheater.

Storks, egrets and ibis eagerly await their meal at mealtime.Storks, egrets and ibis eagerly await their meal at mealtime.

These take place at specific times, so visitors wishing to attend the sessions are advised to plan their visits accordingly.

A full-day photoshoot with some of the most colorful parrots, cockatoos, conures and macaws is also available in a dedicated photo booth.

The entire site is accessible to wheelchairs and strollers, with the exception of its amphitheater.

Entrance to the park is restricted to people who have been fully vaccinated and have a low risk status. Children are allowed in if accompanied by fully immunized parents.

The admission fee for Malaysians with MyKad is RM 25 per adult and RM 12 per child / senior. Entrance is free for people with disabilities.

Entrance to the park, when it is allowed to open, is restricted to fully vaccinated people.

* KL Bird Park is temporarily closed as part of phase two of the national recovery plan, in accordance with directives from the National Security Council. For more details, visit www.klbirdpark.com.



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Apple’s MacBook M1 screens are stunning – incredibly fragile and faulty, legal action alleges claim • The Register https://budgies-paradise.com/apples-macbook-m1-screens-are-stunning-incredibly-fragile-and-faulty-legal-action-alleges-claim-the-register/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 22:38:00 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/apples-macbook-m1-screens-are-stunning-incredibly-fragile-and-faulty-legal-action-alleges-claim-the-register/ The aggrieved MacBook owners in two separate lawsuits claim that Apple’s latest laptops with its M1 chips have faulty screens that break easily and perform poorly. The complaints, both filed Wednesday in federal district court in San Jose, Calif., Each seek class certification in the hope that the law firms involved will gain judicial clearance […]]]>


The aggrieved MacBook owners in two separate lawsuits claim that Apple’s latest laptops with its M1 chips have faulty screens that break easily and perform poorly.

The complaints, both filed Wednesday in federal district court in San Jose, Calif., Each seek class certification in the hope that the law firms involved will gain judicial clearance to represent the allegedly important group. of affected customers and, in case of victory, share any settlement.

Each of the documents claim that Apple’s 2020-2021 MacBook lineup – consisting of the M1-based MacBook Air and the M1-based 13 “MacBook Pro – has screens that frequently fail. They say Apple was aware of the defect. alleged or should have known, based on its own extensive internal testing, technician reports and customer feedback.

“[T]The MacBook M1 is faulty because the screens are extremely fragile, crack, darken or have magenta, purple and blue lines and squares, or stop working altogether, ”states a complaint filed on behalf of the plaintiff Nestor Almeida [PDF]. “Thousands of users around the world have reported this issue directly to Apple and on Apple Sponsored Forums.”

Image of faulty Apple MacBook screen following Almeida's complaint

Photograph of one of the trials of a broken screen, redacted by the owner … Click to enlarge

The other complaint [PDF], filed on behalf of plaintiffs Daphne Pareas and Daniel Friend, makes similar allegations.

“Class laptops are designed and manufactured with an inherent flaw that compromises the display screen,” he says. “During normal use, the display screens of Class (1) laptops may become obscured by black or gray bars and / or ‘dead spots’ where no visual output is displayed and (2) are vulnerable to cracks that obscure parts of the screen. The appearance of black or gray bars on the screen may precede, accompany or follow cracks in the display glass. “

Almeida’s complaint states that thousands of Apple customers around the world have reported MacBook screen issues to Apple and in online forums. He claims Apple has often refused to pay for repairs, forcing customers to pay up to $ 850 through external vendors. And where Apple did the repairs, some customers have seen the problems come back.

Apple, according to Almeida’s complaint, did not recognize the problem, despite its own internal testing and user complaints, until August 27, 2021.

That’s when Apple – “perhaps sensing the onslaught of litigation” – posted a note of support advising customers who use a camera cover, palm rest cover, or keyboard cover to remove the accessory before closing their MacBook to avoid damaging the screen.

“Leaving hardware on your screen, keyboard, or palm rest can interfere with the screen when it is closed and damage your screen,” the warning from Apple says.

But the complaint points to a litany of complaints on social media that suggest screen issues are occurring regardless of the laptop shutting down carefully.

The Pareas / Friend complaint also includes a long list of quotes on social media regarding M1 based MacBook screen issues, such as this Reddit thread and that 14 page thread on Apple’s discussion board titled “MacBook Air M1 Screen Cracked for No Apparent Reason”.

here is an example from the Apple discussion board:

And there are enough of these stories posted online for the litigation to end up in court.

The two complaints blame him for the effusive marketing of Apple.

“[Apple’s] marketing materials for the thin and light Macbook Air tout its superior materials and durability, ”states the Pareas / Friend complaint. “According to its product web page, the device is ‘thin and light.’ Yet rock solid, “and its” rugged aluminum unibody design makes the MacBook Air stylish, durable and ready for anything. “

The record argues that “[h]ad Apple has revealed the truth, for example in its advertisements or other materials or communications, “customers would have looked elsewhere or paid less.

Almeida’s complaint meanwhile throws Apple’s insistence that “everything looks beautiful on the 13-inch Retina display” of the 2020 MacBook Air returning to the company, noting that not everything has looks gorgeous when the screen cracks and turns off.

The register would like to know how Apple’s marketing copy might read if free speech rights were restricted and ambitious product descriptions had to cover worst-case scenarios. We asked Apple for comment, but – and you might be shocked to hear this – we haven’t heard back. ®



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