Song bird – Budgies Paradise http://budgies-paradise.com/ Mon, 20 Sep 2021 00:17:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://budgies-paradise.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-41-150x150.png Song bird – Budgies Paradise http://budgies-paradise.com/ 32 32 South Florida Karen Smith Swansation Legacy Scholarship Launched https://budgies-paradise.com/south-florida-karen-smith-swansation-legacy-scholarship-launched/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 20:15:49 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/south-florida-karen-smith-swansation-legacy-scholarship-launched/ In honor of their “Swansation Songbird,” the St Hugh’s Alumnae Association of South Florida launched a Merit Scholarship to provide a scholarship to at least one student at the institution. The official name of the scholarship is the “Karen Smith Swansation Legacy Scholarship”. Karen Smith, died on September 11e, attended St Hugh’s from 1971 to […]]]>

In honor of their “Swansation Songbird,” the St Hugh’s Alumnae Association of South Florida launched a Merit Scholarship to provide a scholarship to at least one student at the institution. The official name of the scholarship is the “Karen Smith Swansation Legacy Scholarship”. Karen Smith, died on September 11e, attended St Hugh’s from 1971 to 1976.

In a touching tribute at their annual Family Fun Day in Sunrise, Florida, her friend and classmate Karleen Foster shared more of what we learned about the Songbird of Jamaica over the past week .

“Those who knew Karen Smith know that if there ever was a perfect human being, it was Karen. She was an earthly angel – she was compassionate, generous and had such a generous heart. She always embraced and raised her St. Hugh’s family members, ”Foster told the nodded group which included several representatives from other schools.

She spoke of Karen as a talented, gracious, charming and spirited person who made everyone feel special. “She would light up any room she walked into with her oh so beautiful smile.” She would welcome you as Precious, Sweet Girl, Beautiful Lady or Darling.

Foster said that “her friend’s unforgettable melodic voice, beautiful wit and stellar performances have pleased so many people both in Jamaica and abroad.”

“You could say Karen left us too soon, but God had plans and sent his angels for her. He needed her angelic voice and I know she’s up there snapping her fingers and dancing, ”Foster added.

Former Florida chapter president and scholarship committee member Karen Murphy said the scholarship would go to an eleventh-year student who excels in the music program. The recipient will be chosen on merit by the school, said Murphy Caribbean National News Weekly.

“After losing our dear sister Karen Smith last Saturday, the South Florida Chapter established an annual scholarship on September 15 in her memory.” Murphy said the lucky student will have their tuition, supplies and incidentals, including transportation, taken care of.

St Hugh's High Scholl Alumnae
St Hugh’s High Scholl Alumnae released four doves on their day of family fun in memory of late former student Karen Smith. Left to right are Georgia Salmon, Consul General Oliver Mair, Karleen Foster, Althea Vassel and Janice Wright

Paying homage to Smith’s many years of performing at alumni events, the group also released four White Doves; three representing the holy trinity and one for Karen. On hand to help was the Consul General for the Southern United States, CG Oliver Mair.

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Indian clicks amazing photo of sunbird bathing inside flower petal https://budgies-paradise.com/indian-clicks-amazing-photo-of-sunbird-bathing-inside-flower-petal/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 21:03:01 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/indian-clicks-amazing-photo-of-sunbird-bathing-inside-flower-petal/ Cameras have evolved considerably over the past decade. If you were born in the 90s, you can understand the transition that cameras have gone through in recent years – what was once considered impractical on a giant camera can now be achieved on your smartphone – and this story of a Crimson songbird testifies to […]]]>

Cameras have evolved considerably over the past decade. If you were born in the 90s, you can understand the transition that cameras have gone through in recent years – what was once considered impractical on a giant camera can now be achieved on your smartphone – and this story of a Crimson songbird testifies to this.

While the traditional camera industry may struggle to keep pace with smartphone cameras, the work of an Indian photographer shines a light on the wonders of the world that incisive photography is capable of capturing..

A songbird bathing in a banana flower petal | Instagram @rahulsinghclicks

Read also: 16-year-old Pune teenager captured Jupiter and Saturn on his camera: he shares with us how he did it

Bathing Crimson Songbird

Rahul Singh from Jalpaiguri, West Bengal, India captured an astonishing moment in August 2020 when he saw a crimson bird bathing in a flower petal that was melting from the weight of the water. The banana flower petal had been filled with drizzle since the wee hours of the morning.

According to The Dodo, Singh saw the 4-inch-long songbird sucking nectar from the flower before deciding to take a bath.

Singh was on hand to take photos of birds feeding on banana nectar and didn’t expect to witness nature’s weird ways when he went to take the photos that day..

A songbird bathing in a banana flower petal |  Instagram @rahulsinghclicks
A songbird bathing in a banana flower petal | Instagram @rahulsinghclicks

Read also : Hummingbirds have a super power: they can sense danger like no other bird species.

“I was literally stunned,” Singh told The Dodo, adding that he hadn’t stopped taking photos when he saw the songbird bathing in the flower’s petal. To share his joy with the world, Singh shared the beautiful images on Instagram.

In his caption, he mentioned that the images were taken on a Nikon D7100, which is a common digital SLR camera used by professional photographers. And while this photo of a songbird bathing inside a flower petal is a testimonial from the photographer, we must not forget the role digital cameras play in capturing amazing images better and better. of nature.

The history of cameras

The world’s first camera can be dated to 1021, known as “Camera Obscura”. While taking such detailed pictures of birds may not have been a success with these cameras, today’s DSLRs and smartphones can capture beautiful images.

A songbird bathing in a banana flower petal |  Instagram @rahulsinghclicks
A songbird bathing in a banana flower petal | Instagram @rahulsinghclicks

Read also : Watch: Bird gives heartbreaking cry of crying baby at Australian Zoo

It wasn’t until 1826 that the world’s first photograph was clicked. Soon after, Kodak sold its first commercial camera. In fact, the first professional digital camera was not introduced until 1991.

Wait … The first camera phone only came out 21 years ago – in 2000. Do you think such a stunning photograph would be possible without advancements in camera technology? Let us know in the comments. For the latest science and technology news and ideas, keep reading Indiatimes.com.



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Wildlife Commission provides update on mysterious songbird disease | Local News https://budgies-paradise.com/wildlife-commission-provides-update-on-mysterious-songbird-disease-local-news/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 20:03:13 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/wildlife-commission-provides-update-on-mysterious-songbird-disease-local-news/ A bird that has been struck by a mysterious disease that has affected birds across the country is shown. North Carolina Wildlife Commission From staff reports North Carolina Wildlife Commission officials recently announced that the outbreak affecting songbirds since May 2020 appears to be abating and, thanks to diligent reports from North Carolina residents, it […]]]>





A bird that has been struck by a mysterious disease that has affected birds across the country is shown.


North Carolina Wildlife Commission


From staff reports

North Carolina Wildlife Commission officials recently announced that the outbreak affecting songbirds since May 2020 appears to be abating and, thanks to diligent reports from North Carolina residents, it does not appear to have particularly affected the birds of the state.

The mysterious disease has been reported primarily in the Mid-Atlantic and Midwestern states, and as far south as Virginia with a few cases in Florida. It primarily affected the chicks of larger songbirds, such as blue jays, American robins, European starlings, and Common Blackbirds. The sick birds showed an unusual set of symptoms starting with crusty, swollen eyes that progressed to tremors, an inability to maintain balance, and other neurological issues that ultimately ended in death despite best efforts to treat the birds.

Several state wildlife agencies, conservation organizations and wildlife diagnostic labs have been tracking the outbreak to try to identify a cause, but its source remains a mystery. The hypothetical causes, which include the emergence of the cicada Brood X to a variety of viruses, bacteria and parasites, have all been ruled out.

In North Carolina, lab results from publicly reported deceased birds indicate malnutrition and physical trauma are the cause of death – common dangers to inexperienced young birds. Additional lab reports are still pending, but biologists do not anticipate new findings.


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Prime Video’s ‘Do, Re & Mi’ hits all the right notes https://budgies-paradise.com/prime-videos-do-re-mi-hits-all-the-right-notes/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 19:56:00 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/prime-videos-do-re-mi-hits-all-the-right-notes/ The preschool animated series, Do Re Mi, launches on Prime Video today, September 17, inviting kids into a world that not only entertains them with melodies and harmonies, but also educates them about instruments, notes, a new musical genre in every episode. , and more. Three adorable birds, 12 episodes and a huge amount of […]]]>

The preschool animated series, Do Re Mi, launches on Prime Video today, September 17, inviting kids into a world that not only entertains them with melodies and harmonies, but also educates them about instruments, notes, a new musical genre in every episode. , and more. Three adorable birds, 12 episodes and a huge amount of music are now available to children in 240 countries.

It’s a project that creators Jackie Tohn and Michael Scharf have had around the world since 2014.

“I don’t want to call it luck, because Mike and I worked our buns for seven years,” says actor and performer Tohn, executive producer of the series with Scharf, known for his role as Melanie Rosen in GLOW. “But every step of the way for me and Mike we ask ourselves, ‘Is this going to happen? Or is it going to die here? Is anyone going to care? You just don’t know what it’s going to be. And at this point, we kind of feel like we won the lottery.

Scharf, known for The Moon and the Son: an imaginary conversation, adds, “I think the hardest part was that it’s all about simplicity in this industry. When you walk into a room saying there has to be a new song and genre in every episode, and you try to make an introduction to music education accessible to all the children in the world, most of the time. industry is not used to hear this big picture. Getting them involved and really understanding how influential the project can be is riddled with doubts. But at the end of the day, we’re just trying to make children’s lives better, and anyone can support that. “

The series, produced by Gaumont Television and Amazon Studios, drew FrozenKristen Bell as executive producer and voice of the Mi Blue Songbird, and Fast & Furious: Spy Racers‘Luke Youngblood as the melodious owl Do, with Tohn as a brave, lyrical and very rosy Re.

“The art is the only part of the show that I haven’t got my hands on, so I can say with confidence, without bragging, that this is the most beautiful children’s show I have ever seen in all. my life, ”notes Tohn. ” It’s just wonderful. And it’s shocking because we have this concept, and then you see this thing come to life and be so vibrant and beautiful.

The show’s three best bird friends – Do, Re and Mi – live in Beebopsburgh, a colorful town with piano sidewalks, guitar forests, beat-note bushes, instrument-shaped houses and trees with chime leaves.

“We really wanted to make sure it was all about the music,” says Scharf. “The characters will have musical symbology on their faces and their glasses, playsets and 3D animation sets will also be musical instruments. The plants of this world make instruments grow. There are the falsetto forests and the music mountain. Everything is fully engaged in music education and music terminology.

Led by their friend Maestro Moon, Do, Re and Mi go on an adventure to discover music and its role in problem solving. The show not only focuses on a new genre with each episode, but also features new bird friends and original songs from Tohn, David Schuler, Brittany Dunton and Jake Monaco.

“I like to call it ‘sneaky teaching,’ says Tohn. “I think what’s special Do Re Mi is that each episode has a musical genre, a musical lesson, and an emotional lesson. And all this takes place under the aegis of this beautiful and exciting musical spectacle set in a musical world. Thanks to our curious characters, the children who watch the series will learn because our characters learn in real time. The kids are going to have a great time watching, they won’t even know they are learning.

Scharf adds, “David and Jackie wrote some of the most amazing preschool music ever. And Fabien Ouvrard, our director, breaks the mold of preschool staging. It uses dynamic shots which, because of the music, give us this possibility of having clips. So we can have trained plans and all those things that are not traditional in preschool education and preschool entertainment. “

But Scharf and Tohn’s mission goes beyond the simple animated series. To accompany the show’s launch, the team is also publishing a storybook that tells the first episode of Do Re Mi, interactive musical instruments and playsets, a mobile game that incorporates aspects of music education – such as rhythm tracking, musical vocabulary, and instrument identification – as well as a guide for teachers and students. families designed to help educators and families help young children build basic musical skills by instilling a fundamental love for music.

“Music has always been a big part of Jackie’s life and my life,” says Scharf. “My mom wanted me to be a classical pianist and I took music education classes from kindergarten to senior level, although I wasn’t very good at it, but I had a wonderful time. We really wanted to create something that could give the kids, who didn’t have the chance, the experience we had.

For Scharf and Tohn, they see Do Re Mi as a testament to the importance of music in a world that does not regard music as a priority in educational programs.

“When budgets are cut in schools, the first thing to do is music and arts education,” explains Tohn. “From the start, we’ve been very passionate about our show mission, which is to make sure music education gets into the brains and hands of children.”

She continues: “Children who learn music don’t just become musicians. They become more functional adults. It helps with social skills. Arts education, without it, none of us would be where we are and it’s a shame that she’s the first to go. So, we are really passionate about replacing the education that was missing in schools.

And after seven years, the creators say what they’ve been looking forward to the most with the series premiere is watching the kids sing the songs of Do Re Mi and grow from experience.

The kids singing the songs are going to be crazy to me, ”Tohn says. “Every person I know who has kids, I’m like, ‘If I don’t get video footage of your kids singing these songs, I don’t even know what that friendship was for.'”

Scharf agrees.

“And then hearing different stories of kids outwitting their parents in musical terminology,” he notes, “And at an advanced level before they’re technically supposed to, would just be a huge dream for us. . “

Victoria Davis photo

Victoria Davis is a full-time freelance journalist and part-time Otaku with an affinity for all things anime. She has reported on many stories ranging from activist news to entertainment. To learn more about his work, visit victoriadavisdepiction.com.


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Why Ripper Musk Duck and many other talkative Australian birds are exciting biologists https://budgies-paradise.com/why-ripper-musk-duck-and-many-other-talkative-australian-birds-are-exciting-biologists/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 05:22:02 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/why-ripper-musk-duck-and-many-other-talkative-australian-birds-are-exciting-biologists/ Recently, two native Australian birds stole the show with their impressive vocal imitations. A stunning lyre bird called Echo at Taronga Zoo in Sydney produced a painfully realistic vocal rendition of a crying human baby. Lyrebirds are already world famous for their surprisingly precise vocal mimicry, but these new recordings show that their abilities can […]]]>

Recently, two native Australian birds stole the show with their impressive vocal imitations.

A stunning lyre bird called Echo at Taronga Zoo in Sydney produced a painfully realistic vocal rendition of a crying human baby. Lyrebirds are already world famous for their surprisingly precise vocal mimicry, but these new recordings show that their abilities can still surprise.

Then a new newspaper announced the arrival of an unexpected newcomer to the Australian vocal imitation scene. A male musk duck (Biziura lobata) named Ripper was recorded mimicking two stereotypical Australian sounds: a door closing loudly and a person exclaiming “Fool!” “.

The sound of the door, at least, turned out to be a hit with one of Ripper’s male colleagues who ended up mimicking the sound as well. Excitingly, these recordings – originating in the 1980s and taken from the archives – provide the first physical evidence of a duck species copying sound in its environment, disrupting current understandings of the evolution of vocal learning in human beings. birds.

So why do birds cry and swear?

Why musk ducks are weird

Learning voice production is a highly specialized trait that is rare in animals. It requires flexible and sophisticated control of voice production and can be associated with enlarged brain regions compared to non-voice learners.

For a long time, the only other animals known to possess vocal learning abilities similar to humans were parrots and male songbirds. But today, the musk duck joins a large, but relatively small, list of non-human animals capable of vocal learning, including bats, elephants, dolphins, whales and seals. Late on we can now add female songbirds to the list of voice production learners.

Dolphins are among the few animals with vocal learning ability.
Shutterstock

The talkative “Ripper” was a male musk duck bred in captivity in the Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve near Canberra. When he hatched, with the help of a foster dwarf hen, he was the only musk duck there.

But even in the wild, musk ducks are strange. Male musk ducks are up to three times the size of females and have a distinctive bulbous skin lobe hanging down from their beaks. Their name comes from the musky smell emitted by dominant males.

During the breeding season, the males group together (in “leks”) and perform exciting aquatic courtship displays for the females, day and night. Each male performs a structured audiovisual display with his tail on his back, inflating his throat lobe and splashing water while hissing loudly.

In the wild, male whistles seem to form local dialects – a signature of vocal learning. But this does not imply imitations of other species.

Ripper produced a lot of wild display items, but avidly displayed it to people. His bizarre mimicry of anthropogenic sounds was part of this display.

Hear Ripper say ‘you fool’

Imitate in captivity

The story of the Ripper is part of a long scientific tradition. Captive-bred parrots and some songbirds imitating human speech feature in ancient European writings, including the works of Aristotle and Pliny the Elder.

More recently, the possible complexities of parrot communication were explored in a pioneering study on “Alex”, the captive African gray parrot, which had a vocabulary of over 100 words.

Video caption Alex.

Overall, such accounts of human imitations involve a captive individual raised in isolation from others of their own kind, but in close association with a human guardian. The human guardian then becomes the social model for the vocal development of the captive bird.

So while these examples reveal an animal’s ability to learn voice production, they do not show that wild animals mimic the sounds of their surroundings. Indeed, very few animal species that mimic humans in captivity produce anything other than their own species-specific vocalizations in the wild.

However, this is not the case with Australian lyrebirds and other avian vocal imitators.

Mimicry in wild Australia

Two species of lyrebirds are famous for the diversity and precision of their vocal mimicry: the superb lyrebird of the humid eucalyptus forests of south-eastern Australia and the Albert’s lyrebird of the subtropical eastern Australia.

In captivity, stunning male lyre birds have been recorded mimicking anthropogenic sounds ranging from chainsaws, emergency vehicle sirens to this new recording of a crying human baby.

Stunning lyre bird
Stunning lyre birds have been recorded mimicking chainsaws, mermaids and more.
Shutterstock

In the wild, males and females perfectly mimic the vocalizations and wingbeats of other species of birds – and sometimes mammals. A single superb male lyrebird can even mimic a flock of fear-mongering birds.

Despite many rumors, it remains a bit of a mystery when and how often wild lyrebirds mimic human-made sounds.

Lyre birds aren’t the only ones. Australia is the fortunate country of a surprisingly high number of songbird species that regularly mimic in nature, from tiny thorns to large, enigmatic birds that, even in the wild, sometimes produce surprisingly accurate interpretations of the birds. humans.



Read more: Imitators Among Us – Pirate Bird Songs For Personal Benefit


But not all imitators are what they seem. In one heartbreaking example, the mimetic song of the Regent Honeyeater is both a consequence and a cause of the decline of the species. Wild males copy other species because there are not enough males left to pass their song on to the next generation.

Regent Honeyeater are critically endangered songbirds.
Shutterstock

Threatened archive treasures

Ripper the swearing musk duck, Echo the howling lyre bird and the forgotten songs of the Regent Honeyeater show us all that remains to be discovered about the extraordinary birds of Australia. Far from being the biogeographic quirk, Australian birds are further unsettling biological theory.

Ripper was an ’80s bird, and we only know of his bizarre mimicry because Rippers’ recorder Dr Peter Fullagar was on a mission to establish a natural history sound archive for Australia. Like all good ’80s singers, Ripper was recorded on tape before Peter digitized it.

It was only from historical records that researchers were able to discover that the original song of the Regent Honeyeater was unique to the species and more elaborate than the songs of contemporary males. Just listening to captive-bred birds or increasingly rare songsters in the wild is no longer enough to reveal the Regent Honeyeater’s natural song: the baseline has changed.

What other treasures collect dust in forgotten sheds or piles of bookcases? We have to be quick, before these tapes degrade too much to be heard.



Read more: Only the loners: Endangered bird forgets its song as the species goes extinct



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Jamaican songbird Karen Smith – Final words to her friends and who she really was https://budgies-paradise.com/jamaican-songbird-karen-smith-final-words-to-her-friends-and-who-she-really-was/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 17:33:33 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/jamaican-songbird-karen-smith-final-words-to-her-friends-and-who-she-really-was/ Terrence [email protected] Five days before her death, Karen Smith sent a voice note to friends thanking them for remembering her birthday on September 6. “Good afternoon everyone. It’s Karen and I want to thank you very much for all your loving thoughts, kindness, prayers, oh my god. Thanks for everything. It’s a different way to […]]]>
Terrence [email protected]

Five days before her death, Karen Smith sent a voice note to friends thanking them for remembering her birthday on September 6. “Good afternoon everyone. It’s Karen and I want to thank you very much for all your loving thoughts, kindness, prayers, oh my god. Thanks for everything. It’s a different way to spend a birthday sure but God is good, God is king, God is faithful. I am in touch, and I believe he will heal. Much love to you and so nice to hear from you. The message ended with a kiss .


Such was the character and spirit of one of Jamaica’s finest songbirds. Karen Smith was a special quality, blessed with a voice that you never tire of. She was also a philanthropist and fighter for the cause of musicians.

Sadly, she lost her battle with colon cancer five days after her 61st birthday, September 11e. She left behind thousands of painful hearts but also precious memories.

Karen Smith was an extraordinary talent with a voice as sweet as the Jamaican Hummingbird. Whether she spoke or sang the words, the effervescent vibes she distributed was bound to cheer you up. Filled with compassion, generosity and a heart overflowing with selflessness, this singing wonder woman brought sweet melodies to our ears and happiness to our hearts. She was respected, admired and loved, not only because of her singing prowess, but also because of the affable vibe her presence exudes.

Daughter of the school principal, Karen is an alumnus of St Hugh’s High School and graduated with a business degree from Concordia University in Montreal, Canada. She started her professional life in banking before following her passion and talent full time in 1986.

A creature of light and love

Jeffrey Cobham, former managing director of the National Commercial Bank, was the manager of the St. James Street branch where Smith began his banking experience. He described Karen as “a creature of Light and Love”. In a conversation with the singer in the early days before she set out on her destiny, Cobham recalled her advice to the talented singer and young banker: “She told me about her choices. told her that I had no doubt that she would move into the banking profession because she was smart and learned quickly, but that these qualities would also serve her well in the entertainment world. The question, however, was whether she Twenty years from now, as she, like thousands of other bankers, would go through yet another set of bank lending statistics, sigh and wonder if she could have given the world something unique. ‘she made the right choice,’ he noted.

Quintessence of Grace and Leadership

Edmond Bartlett
Edmund Bartlett, Jamaican Minister of Tourism

The Jamaican tourism industry has benefited greatly from Karen’s incredible singing skills, as she performed as a cabaret singer in resort areas. Tourism Minister Edmund Bartlett said: “The entire tourism industry mourns the passing of Karen Smith, who brought a sparkle and wonderful professionalism to her performance.”

“I’m really proud to have been a friend of Karen, she was certainly the epitome of grace, charm and creativity. Her songs not only charmed so many of us but also created a sense of comfort. for so many people in various circumstances. She will also be remembered for the excellent leadership she provided to the musical fraternity. I offer my sincere condolences to her family, friends and colleagues, “he said. -he declares.

Tourism Director Donovan White said Karen is synonymous with entertainment in tourism and is a must-see artist for many industry events. “You knew that once Karen booked, the performance would be smooth and engaging.”

For her contribution to the Jamaican music industry, she was awarded the Order of Distinction in Officer rank by the Jamaican government. She has also received nine Jamaican Music Industry Awards. She and her husband Jackie Jackson, a grassroots guitarist, were inducted into the Ocho Rios Jazz Festival Hall of Fame in 2001.

She flaunted her talent all over the world because she was in demand. Jamaican alumni associations in Jamaica and the Diaspora have benefited enormously from his skills. She has lent her voice to many charities and has collaborated with many prominent artists, both local and international during her incredible time on earth.

She opened for Natalie Cole, Smokey Robinson, Harry Belafonte, Seal, James Ingram, Ray Charles and Air Supply. And in 1990, when the Rio Hotel in Las Vegas opened, she was the first star actor. Karen recorded three albums. “Reflections of Love” was released in 2003 and had a mix of Reggae, Hip Hop and R&B. “I Still Love You” was released in 2012 and “Rush” entered the market in 2017. In her later years, Karen teamed up with Gem Myers and Patricia Edwards to form the PaKaGe group. They have performed widely in Jamaica and abroad.

Karen Smith, Gem Myers, Patricia Edwards in the PaKaGe group
Karen (right) performs with Gem Myers and Patricia Edwards as PaKaGe at Cornwall College Alumni-South Florida Dinner Dance in 2019 Terrence [email protected] Terbo

Positive, Vibrant, Energetic

While Karen’s passing will leave a void in Jamaica’s entertainment industry, a huge hole will remain in the hearts of her dear friends. People close to her see more than her talent on display.

Janet SilveraA close friend, Janet Silvera, president of the Montego Bay Chamber of Commerce, spoke of Karen’s positivity, influence and fighting spirit: “In the years that I have known Karen, I never Never heard her say anything negative about anyone. She was ready to stand up against injustices and fight for the rights of the musical fraternity. She was truly a very positive influence, who loved unconditionally and had a hard time saying no, especially if a performance she agreed to do on top of that helped those in need.

Silvera, who has benefited from either being in the audience or as an event promoter, loves the energy of the songbird. “There was an unprecedented drive, energy and talent that Karen was blessed with. When she entertained an audience, the whole place / hall became part of the act. Karen’s heart was as moving as the songs she sang. To me, she was an earthly angel with a purpose. She completed this goal and moved to another realm. Those of us who have known the real Karen Smith consider ourselves extremely lucky. I am richer to know her.

Ultimate professional, dedicated

Steve Higgins, a renowned Jamaican singer and friend, raved about Karen’s talent and character. “Karen Smith’s angelic voice gave us all a glimpse of her effervescent and refreshing spirit and beautiful soul. She embodied gentleness with unrestrained love and enthusiastic excitement in everything she did.

Karen Smith and Steve HigginsOn stage, she sang with boundless energy, especially when we sang the duet “Endless Love”, placing a sweet smile on everyone’s heart and a lively rhythm in their being! Off the stage, she championed many causes, which she championed with great vigor and an appropriate dose of sheer charm. Karen Smith has always been totally dedicated to her family and to her profession. She was the ultimate professional and a selfless human being. It was always a pleasure to sing with her, chat with her or just play silly with her. She met every opportunity with the right dose of reality, passion and love. It was an absolute pleasure to see her sing with Steve Higgins Productions and she will be sorely missed.

Sweet and friendly

Leighton McKnight, another close friend of Karen and her family, took it very hard. “She is famous for her superbly melodious voice which has made her one of the best cabaret singers ever produced in Jamaica. Beyond that, she was easily one of the sweetest, friendliest people I have ever met. She has never failed to radiate positivity in all of my encounters with her, a trait she has continuously demonstrated admirably even during her devastating illness.

I’ll never forget just a month ago when she called me to wish me a happy birthday, didn’t get me and left me a vocal note with a sweet happy birthday interpretation for me. I returned her call to say thank you and then she and her daughter Courtni put on an even better performance live on the phone, you can’t imagine how uplifting it was, I felt really special.

Opinions of Prime Ministers

Karen’s life touched the lives of all socio-economic groups in Jamaican society. Prime Minister Andrew Holness said he was “deeply saddened by her passing. Affectionately known as ‘Jamaica’s songbird’, Karen Smith was highly regarded as one of the most talented cabaret performers from Jamaica. I enjoyed her wit and warmth, not to mention her immense talent. It was always a pleasure to interact with her; she really captured the essence of what it means to light a room.

Andrew Holness
PM Andrew Holness
PJ Patterson
Former-PM-PJ-Patterson

Former Jamaican Prime Minister PJ Patterson said Karen was “a star [and her] unique style fueled a meteoric rise to the zenith of his chosen field. The former prime minister was a frequent recipient of Karen’s singing skills. When a highway was named in honor of the former chief, it was Karen who sang the serenade to him. And in 2019, when he launched his book “My Political Journey” in Miramar, Florida, Karen was also there to provide entertainment.

Indelible imprint on the left

Jamaican Entertainment Minister Olivia Grange said Smith was “one of the queens of stage performance. Whether performing at national or international events or in small country churches, she was always engaging, entertaining and charming. The Minister added that “Karen has left an indelible mark on Jamaica’s cultural, artistic and entertainment landscape. She has actively contributed to the cause of the development of the industry. Karen’s legendary voice, endearing personality, constant warmth and advocacy will always be remembered. “

She continued, “I am deeply saddened by the news. A voice that resonated among culture and entertainment icons is now muffled and the silence echoes her amazing personality, grace and love for her people. offers my deepest condolences to her husband Jackie Jackson, daughter Courtni, mother Barbara and other relatives and friends Jamaica’s quintessential songbird now sings in New Jerusalem choirs.

Karen is survived by her mother, Barbara Smith, her husband Jackie and daughter Courtni. Her body may not be with us anymore, but her endearing spirit and unforgettable performances will live on forever. Goodbye songbird.

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The Vineyard Gazette – Martha’s Vineyard News https://budgies-paradise.com/the-vineyard-gazette-marthas-vineyard-news/ Wed, 15 Sep 2021 19:25:00 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/the-vineyard-gazette-marthas-vineyard-news/ The morning of September 11 was ideal for finding migrating songbirds. The night before was pleasant and the winds were blowing from the northwest, so nocturnal migrating songbirds had favorable tailwinds as they came from their nesting places as far as Alaska or the boreal forests of northern Canada . To avoid flying over the […]]]>

The morning of September 11 was ideal for finding migrating songbirds. The night before was pleasant and the winds were blowing from the northwest, so nocturnal migrating songbirds had favorable tailwinds as they came from their nesting places as far as Alaska or the boreal forests of northern Canada .

To avoid flying over the Atlantic Ocean, the migrants turned west towards Aquinnah but. once there they discover more ocean, so they can wait there a day or two or three until the weather (wind) conditions are more favorable. Aquinnah, and the Gay Head Cliffs area in particular, is therefore a great place to find these migrants. In the early hours of the morning, they can be seen foraging in the shrubs and trees in this area, refueling after a nighttime migration of up to 300 miles.

Bird watchers flock there too! On September 11, Susan Whiting and Bob Shriber were there and they found a Crested Flycatcher, Eastern Kingbird, Red-eyed Vireo, Red-breasted Nuthatch, House Wren, 30 Cedar Waxwings, five Goglus, three warblers, a Cape warbler and northern parula.

Immature male American Redstart – Lanny mcdowell

At a different time that morning, Andrew and Merrill Eppedio added the Northern Harrier, Swivel, Peregrine Falcon, Eastern Woodpecker, Blue-headed Vireo, Blue-Gray Midge, Sturnelle meadows, indigo bunting, dickcissel, 674 cedar waxwings and 217 goblins. The last two species were counted as they flew west over our heads!

Aquinnah can also be good in less favorable wind conditions. Pete Gilmore, Susan Whiting and Bob Shriber were there on September 10 and their highlights were the gray blue gnat, kestrel, swivel, house wren, redstart, prairie warbler, house sparrow and a Peregrine falcon strafing an immature black-backed gull.

Baby bird – Lanny McDowell

At Gay Head Moraine on September 8, Lanny McDowell’s highlight was an oven bird. This property is a good place to search for birds as it includes mature woodlands which are prime habitats for many of our forest birds.

Of course, migratory birds can appear anywhere on the island. At the Edgartown Golf Club on September 11, Ken Magnuson spotted a Northern Warbler and had two Nighthawks flying overhead last week. Spotted a Nightjar flying over Kanomika Neck over Edgartown Great Pond on the evening of September 11th. Dave Oster spotted a redstart at Felix Neck on September 11.

The next day, Phil Edmundson found Eastern Woodpecker, Eastern Phoebe, Philadelphia Vireo, Red-eyed Vireo, House Sparrow, Masked Warbler, and Yellow-breasted Warbler in the woods. near Watcha Pond. Also on September 12, John Nelson was sitting on his deck and spotted a dewormer warbler. These last two species are only seen occasionally.

The hummingbirds are still hanging out. This week’s sightings come from John Nelson, Heather Rynd, Wayne Smith, Betty Burton, Warren Morse, Mary Beth Baptiste, Kathy Landers, Sheilah Hughes, Lucy Sheldon, Tom Hodgson, Les Cutlers, Bob Shriber, Penny Uhlendorf and Robin Bray.

Blue-gray gnatcatcher – Lanny McDowell

Felix Neck has been a hot spot for wading birds this fall. There have been yellow-crowned night herons and little blue herons in addition to the more anticipated great blue heron, green heron, great egret and snow egret. There have been four little bruises and up to three yellow-crowned night herons reported recently by Jeff Bernier, Amy Morganthau, Dan Cabot, Steve Allen, Shea Fee and Brayden, Andrew and Merrill Eppedio.

An immature yellow-crowned night heron stood in the parking lot at Squibnocket Beach, seen by Lanny McDowell and Pete Gilmore. One was at Norton Point, spotted by Shea Fee on September 10. Lisa Maxfield reported two yellow-crowned night herons at Brush Pond. That’s a lot of night herons for the island! And she reports that there were 10 of the much more common black-crowned night herons perched in the trees at Brush Pond on September 6.

An osprey hangs out at Felix Neck, seen on September 10 by Steve Allen and the birding group he leads, and I spotted it on September 13. They are rare because most of the more than 100 breeding pairs have already left for their wintering grounds.

Yellow breasted cat – Lanny McDowell

A few curlews linger at Norton Point Beach. Lisa Maxfield, Shea Fee, Susan Whiting, Warren Woessner, and Bob Shriber have all seen one or two recently. On September 12, these last three ornithologists also spotted the American oystercatcher, 105 black-bellied plovers, 26 semipalmated plovers, three red knot, 145 sanderling, 1 minor sandpiper, 8 half-sandpiper, five short-billed sandpipers, 1 small knight, 105 laughing gulls, 55 ring-billed gulls, a small immature black-backed gull, a barn swallow and two salt marsh sparrows.

Perhaps the most unusual bird this week is the American Bittern spotted by Shea Fee in the salt marsh at the western end of Norton Point on September 10.

American Bittern – Lanny mcdowell

Phil Edmundson spotted a flock of seven small black-backed gulls along the south shore of West Tisbury.

A smaller number of our more common shorebirds were seen at Little Beach last week by Bob Shriber, Warren Woessner, Pete Gilmore, Susan Whiting, Lanny McDowell, Dave Oster and Merril and Andrew Eppedio. and 150 common terns.

My 9/11 bird tour with the Edgartown Public Library spotted a feeding frenzy of 35 laughing gulls, 15 herring gulls, 2 ring-billed gulls, a great black-backed gull, a great egret and two soaring, diving double-crested cormorants. and dive to feast on the school of small fish.

Common Nighthawk – Lanny McDowell

Lanny McDowell and Jeff Peters both spotted a large peregrine falcon near the Steamship Authority wharf in Vineyard Haven on September 1. Randy Rynd has heard and seen Eastern Woodpeckers near Thimble Farm in recent weeks. On September 5, Pete Gilmore spotted a familiar leucistic sparrow at the West Tisbury Public Safety Building. And on September 11, Dave Oster spotted a crow along Great Plains Road and Mary Beth Naron saw a Bobwhite quail near Lagoon Pond.

Please email your observations to birds@mvgazette.com.

More bird pictures

Robert Culbert is an ecological consultant with Nature Watch LLC living in Vineyard Haven.


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Baby birds start learning songs from inside their cozy eggs, study finds https://budgies-paradise.com/baby-birds-start-learning-songs-from-inside-their-cozy-eggs-study-finds/ Wed, 08 Sep 2021 06:34:45 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/baby-birds-start-learning-songs-from-inside-their-cozy-eggs-study-finds/ Songbirds usually need very little instruction in singing their parents’ tunes, but the right melody doesn’t necessarily come to them “out of the blue” when they hatch. Instead, a new study suggests that most chicks begin to listen to and respond to the song of surrounding birds as mere embryos, while still nestling in their […]]]>

Songbirds usually need very little instruction in singing their parents’ tunes, but the right melody doesn’t necessarily come to them “out of the blue” when they hatch.

Instead, a new study suggests that most chicks begin to listen to and respond to the song of surrounding birds as mere embryos, while still nestling in their eggs.

Even when a species is considered an “innate” songster – with the proper genetics and brain wiring to produce its species’ song once hatched – researchers have also found evidence of embryonic learning.

With enough time and repetition, it seems that unhatched chicks usually get used to noises coming from outside their shells, which is an important part of their vocal development.

“Long before actual vocalization, we discovered that these tiny songbirds also discriminated against non-specific sounds and were capable of” non-associative “(not parental) sounds, relying on the complexity of vocal learning in songbirds, ”explains animal behaviorist Diane. Colombelli-Négrel from Flinders University in Australia.

According to historical classification, birds (and other animals) are either vocal learners, able to invent new songs or imitate those of others; or non-learners, stuck with their “innate” repertoires that stem from brain wiring and genetics.

In recent years, however, researchers have started to argue that this binary vocal learning system in vertebrates is too simplistic, and we are in fact dealing with a spectrum or a continuum.

At one end of the spectrum is a high degree of vocal learning, with species able to mimic all kinds of new sounds – many songbird lineages fall into this category, as do humans. On the other hand, you get the relatively limited non-learners, who can only produce sounds of their own kind, and nothing else.

The rest of the birds fall somewhere along the continuum of learned and un-learned vocalizations and sometimes it’s hard to tell the difference between the two.

Even among “acoustically naive” songbirds, which have received little or no vocal instruction, studies have shown that sounds from their own species elicit a stronger neural response than song from an alien species. .

This suggests that baby birds acquire a “voice pattern” in their brains long before they hatch, and new research on bird embryos now supports this idea.

Over the course of seven years, between 2012 and 2019, researchers played a variety of bird calls to eggs from five different bird species.

These included the superb fairy troglodyte (Malurus cyaneus), the red-winged wren (Malurus elegans), Darwin’s Lesser Land Finch (Geospiza fuliginosa), the little penguin (Eudyptule minor), and the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica domestica).

Darwin’s Wren and Finch are considered vocal learners, while Quail and Penguin are generally classified as non-learners. In the first part of the experiment, the researchers exposed 109 embryos to 60 seconds of noise, limited by 60 seconds of silence.

Compared to embryos from non-learners, such as penguins and quails, the authors found that embryos from vocal learners showed a more precise response to the call of their own species at a much earlier stage of development.

This was expected, as recent studies have shown that vocal learners, like zebra finches, can see their behavior as adults altered by the songs their parents sing to them as embryos. Non-learners, on the other hand, don’t seem to have such malleable brains. But that doesn’t mean they don’t absorb any song when they’re in the bud.

In the second part of the experiment, the researchers exposed 138 embryos to 180 seconds of the same bird song, their own species or another, again locked in a minute of silence.

This time, the heart rate of each embryo was measured to determine the attention the baby bird was giving to the repeated call.

Ultimately, the authors found that all birds, learners and non-learners alike, had become accustomed to the repeated external sound, whether from their own species or from a different species.

This indicates an innate level of learning known as habituation, which might help animals distinguish between friendly calls and calls from another.

“The results of this study suggest that the ability to perceive and become accustomed to sound in ovo in developing birds may be taxonomically more widespread than previously thought and also support the idea that learning speech perception is not a binary behavior, ”the authors write.

It is still unclear whether this initial embryonic learning alters the behavior of birds once hatched, but the authors suspect that sound may begin to prepare embryos for life outside of the egg, albeit in a slightly different way with a slightly different timing depending on the species.

For example, studies have already shown that unhatched embryos of some gulls can hear their parents’ warning calls. Additionally, when these same birds are born, they tend to exhibit more defensive behaviors, higher stress levels, and are particularly sensitive to red flags.

More research will be needed to compare the impact of sounds drifting through an eggshell on vocal learners and non-learners as they grow older.

“This research will hopefully inspire more studies on the remarkable ability of animals to learn sound,” said systems biologist Sonia Kleindorfer of Flinders University and the University of Vienna.

“By shifting the time window for sound learning at the prenatal stage, this direction of research opens avenues for measuring the downstream neurobiological effects of early auditory experience on behavior and information processing.”

The study was published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B Biological Sciences.


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Who is Detective Blue? Meet the New Star of Jurong Bird Park’s First-Ever Digital Playground, Life News & Top Stories https://budgies-paradise.com/who-is-detective-blue-meet-the-new-star-of-jurong-bird-parks-first-ever-digital-playground-life-news-top-stories/ Wed, 01 Sep 2021 20:00:00 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/who-is-detective-blue-meet-the-new-star-of-jurong-bird-parks-first-ever-digital-playground-life-news-top-stories/ It’s Jurong Bird Park’s 50th bird-day, and everyone is invited! Home to over 3,500 birds of 400 species, the iconic tourist attraction nestled in an idyllic hilltop was first opened in 1971. Today, it is one of Wildlife Reserves Singapore’s award-winning attractions. Be part of the celebrations and plan a family day out with the […]]]>

It’s Jurong Bird Park’s 50th bird-day, and everyone is invited!

Home to over 3,500 birds of 400 species, the iconic tourist attraction nestled in an idyllic hilltop was first opened in 1971. Today, it is one of Wildlife Reserves Singapore’s award-winning attractions.

Be part of the celebrations and plan a family day out with the little ones to navigate the scenic park, but this time avoid taking your usual walking trail. Instead, go on a GPS-enabled excursion via Wildlife Quest with Detective Blue.

Created specially with AID-DCC, a Japan-based digital production agency, and Crooner Pte Ltd, Wildlife Quest is Jurong Bird Park’s first digital GPS play course that features Detective Blue – a brave little blue-throated cartoon macaw. – as he guides you on an educational journey to see the park from a new perspective.

To get started, all you need to do is go to the kiosk near the park entrance to receive your Wildlife Quest sun visor and a wristband with a personal code. A member of staff will help you download the digital game to your phone and you’ll be ready to explore the sprawling 20ha space.

Ready to start your adventure? First of all, download the digital game Wildlife Quest on your phone. PHOTO: SINGAPORE WILDLIFE RESERVES

Go on an avian adventure

Your digital quest includes nine designated game points for you to visit, but you’re free to locate them or complete each activity in any order you like, at your own pace. At every game point you arrive at, you’ll be given a quiz question to answer, or a task to complete – but don’t worry, you’ll get all the help you need looking for clues around the exhibit !

For example, at Pelican Cove, you will be asked to take a photo or video of yourself holding as many things as possible, to mimic how pelicans use the pouch under their beaks to pick up and store fish.

Your adventure is a great opportunity not only to win exclusive prizes, but also to meet Detective Blue’s many feathered friends. They include brave little penguins that waddle or bathe on the Penguin Coast, beautiful flamingos at the Flamingo Pool, and some 500 birds of 135 species at Wings of Asia, a beautiful walk-in aviary.


Say hello to the flamingos at Flamingo Pool, one of nine game points on the digital game track. PHOTO: SINGAPORE WILDLIFE RESERVES

Indoors, the more delicate birds are kept in individual aviaries, while many more freely fly or roam in specially constructed habitats, giving you opportunities to take photos as you approach them.

Many birds, such as the Santa Cruz land dove, Bali myna, and black-winged myna, are endangered in the wild or poached, but have been successfully bred at Jurong Bird Park.

No visit is complete without discovering Parrot Paradise – home to cockatoos, macaws, lorises and parakeets – and the impressive 35-meter-high Waterfall aviary, with more than 600 free-flying birds.

Once you’ve completed all of the geo-tagged challenges on the Wildlife Quest Trail, return to the booth near Penguin Cove to claim your well-deserved rewards, which include an exclusively designed keychain and explorer badge.


Take part in bird-themed games and sustainable craft activities at the ‘Cacawnival’. PHOTO: SINGAPORE WILDLIFE RESERVES

Catch more bird action

There are many other enrichment activities to enjoy before you stop. Be sure to check out the Cacawnival at Songbird Terrace, which features a range of bird-themed games and sustainable craft activities, or attend a bird-feeding session to see a yellow-billed lori munching on slices of sweet potato, lemon and apple . Don’t leave Jurong Bird Park until you venture inside an egg-shaped portal to watch a video showcasing the park’s heritage and its 50-year history.

End your visit at the Feathers Gift Shop, where you can give the little ones a souvenir to take home; options range from sustainably made Jurong Bird Park 50th Anniversary collectibles such as tote bags made from recycled bottles, notebooks, the Everybirdy is one of a kind! storybook and even T-shirts featuring Detective Blue and his bird friends.

On the trip home, while the sleeping kids are napping, you can post your snaps on Facebook or Instagram with the hashtag # JBP50.

If the little ones find themselves missing their bird friends after the tour, don’t worry: book a live interactive virtual experience via “Hello from the Wild Side”. Hosted by the park’s animal care team, these sessions will feature Quincy the double-headed yellow-headed Amazon and a pair of toco toucans as their keepers cover a variety of bird-related topics such as nutrition, behavior and training.

Wildlife Quest with Detective Blue is available on weekends and holidays until October 31, 2021 as an add-on option for $ 10 when you purchase admission tickets online. You can also purchase the pack, which includes admission to Jurong Bird Park and Wildlife Quest with Detective Blue game (SingapoRediscovers Vouchers redeemable).

Jurong Bird Park is located at 2 Jurong Hill, Singapore 628925. For more information, visit www.birdpark.com.sg.


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Feathered phrases: how birds influence the way we speak and think https://budgies-paradise.com/feathered-phrases-how-birds-influence-the-way-we-speak-and-think/ Sat, 28 Aug 2021 18:21:47 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/feathered-phrases-how-birds-influence-the-way-we-speak-and-think/ Wanita Bates and her trusty binoculars … who are helpful in keeping an eye on neighbors and birds. (Submitted by Wanita Bates) While walking our dogs, years ago, my partner Liz said, “You walk pigeon’s feet.” It was the first and last time she said that. A few weeks ago, on my way to the […]]]>

Wanita Bates and her trusty binoculars … who are helpful in keeping an eye on neighbors and birds. (Submitted by Wanita Bates)

While walking our dogs, years ago, my partner Liz said, “You walk pigeon’s feet.” It was the first and last time she said that.

A few weeks ago, on my way to the pool, I looked at my feet, concentrating on my walk. Dang, all of that, she’s right.

I walked in with Nelly Furtado’s song in my head. You know, “I’m like a bird, I want to fly away.” I thought, what a coincidence. I too am like a bird – a pigeon with crow’s feet.

I told my pool friends about the bird’s words and my revelation on my pigeon toes. Immediately the bird-isms flew out of their mouths: the early riser, the bird in his hand, the birds of a feather, and the wise old owl. I was intrigued. Such a small creature with so many words associated with them.

Birdwatcher is not a word that applies to me, and although I have binoculars, I primarily use them for neighborhood watch. There are times, however, when I will stop and watch robins pecking plump, juicy worms.

When what I’ll call the real housewives of Crow City gather above the lines and start croaking and cooing and clicking, which I wouldn’t give to understand them. Undoubtedly, some fine feathered friends have their feathers ruffled.

Yes i thought i could fly

Did you hear the one about the seven year old girl who thought she could fly? Don’t worry if you haven’t: it was me.

Our family lived in Thompson, Manitoba, and I ran so fast over a gravel-covered playground that I swear I was flying. It was my first and last flight.

A few years later, still in Thompson, we had a cornflower blue parakeet named Jeannie. On a hot day, with the apartment windows open, she took flight and blew the henhouse up.

Do you know how to do the Tennessee Wig Walk? (Submitted by Wanita Bates)

We were inconsolable and ran like chickens with our heads cut off.

I still dream of Jeannie and imagine her facing the nasty winters of Thompson wearing a Hudson’s Bay coat and rubbing her little frozen claws together to keep warm.

I killed a mockingbird in grade 7 and learned a folk dance called Tennessee Wig Walk in physical education. I still know the words. “I am a bow-legged chicken and a kneeling hen.”

In 1974, a seagull named Jonathan Livingston taught me that the biggest obstacle in my life was… me: “All the events of your life are there because you brought them there. What you choose to do with it is up to you.

I sobbed so much over the death of this little bird, it’s no wonder I have crow’s feet.

Magpie trends

My math skills are for birds. However, my aunt calls me a magpie because I like shiny things and I have them everywhere.

And you? Do you eat like a bird, are you happy like a lark, or crazy like a loon or, maybe, a night owl, like my friend Noreen?

What is it that attracts us so much about these warm-blooded, feathered, egg-laying vertebrates with horny beaks and scaly feet?

Mother Nature says, and I’m paraphrasing, that they help fight pests, pollinate plants, and spread the seeds that help us nourish ourselves. Seagulls keep coral reefs alive and Scavenger Vultures – which have such a bad reputation – provide a cleaning service for the ecosystem.

Birds are like thermometers for nature. They react quickly to changes in the environment and scientists study birds because they are early warning systems.

Wanita Bates is always grateful for what birds can tell us about the world around us. (Submitted by Wanita Bates)

Remember the proverbial canary in the coal mine? The first coal mines did not have a ventilation system. The miners would bring a caged canary underground. Canaries are sensitive to methane and carbon monoxide and could detect even the smallest accumulations of gas.

If the canary remained on the perch singing, the air supply was safe. When the bird has fallen from its perch, it is time for you to run for your life.

There are like more than 10,000 species of birds, of all shapes, sizes, colors and differences.

Maybe that’s why there are so many sayings, metaphors, comparisons, idioms and, yes, fun facts. Many of these phrases have influenced not only the way we speak, but also perceive and think.

Did you know that pigeons have been used for millennia to report the results of the Olympic games. Today we are using tweets!

I feel the need to quote Bobby Day’s wisdom here:

“Tweedle-lee-dee-dee-dee, tweedle-lee-dee-dee / Tweedle-lee-dee-dee-dee, tweedle-lee-dee-dee

Tweedle-lee-dee-dee-dee, tweedle-lee-dee-dee / Tweet, tweet, tweet, tweet. “

A few tips before we finish: don’t count your hens before they hatch, don’t put all your eggs in one basket, and go ahead, fly like an eagle!

Next time in the pool, maybe the conversation – and the words – will turn to fish.

Read more about CBC Newfoundland and Labrador


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