Pet bird – Budgies Paradise http://budgies-paradise.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 05:51:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://budgies-paradise.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-41-150x150.png Pet bird – Budgies Paradise http://budgies-paradise.com/ 32 32 High Court urges Delhi government to notify it of enforcement of pet shop rules https://budgies-paradise.com/high-court-urges-delhi-government-to-notify-it-of-enforcement-of-pet-shop-rules/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 05:13:05 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/high-court-urges-delhi-government-to-notify-it-of-enforcement-of-pet-shop-rules/ The Delhi High Court on Monday requested the Delhi government to inform it of the “how and how” the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (Pet Shop) Rules, 2018 are being implemented. The court was hearing a public interest litigation (PIL) requesting the regulation of pet shops in strict compliance with the rules and the Prevention […]]]>

The Delhi High Court on Monday requested the Delhi government to inform it of the “how and how” the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (Pet Shop) Rules, 2018 are being implemented. The court was hearing a public interest litigation (PIL) requesting the regulation of pet shops in strict compliance with the rules and the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act 1980.

A divisional bench of Justice Siddharth Mridul and Justice Amit Sharma said, “Issue a notice to the NCT Government of Delhi through a permanent civil lawyer by all authorized channels…a notice will state that the NCT Government of Delhi would be required to inform this court with respect to the manner and manner in which the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (Pet Shop) Rules 2018 are implemented and enforced in accordance with the law. The case is then listed on December 1st.

Appearing for the PIL litigant, lead attorney Jayant Mehta said the closing arguments are over in this case. During the hearing, the Delhi government was not represented and Mehta said that responses were filed by the defendants and the government was represented in the case in previous hearings.

Mehta argued that as per the response to an RTI request filed by the petitioner in November last year, not even a single pet store was registered with the Delhi Animal Welfare Board. Mehta added that pet shops need a license before housing animals.

Pet Lovers Association, through lead attorney Salman Khurshid, sought to be added to the case arguing that “we want all pet shops regulated – whatever is reasonable should be done…we want let the Animal Welfare Board and the Delhi government tell us what they are doing about it”.

The association, in its application to intervene, said it had more than 1,000 members and 12,000 trained volunteers with the goal of providing an enabling environment for the pet industry and fighting for the well- be birds and animals.

Khurshid further said that the association had challenged the rules in the Supreme Court asking for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (Pet Shop) Rules, 2018, to be struck down for being contrary to the provisions of the Animal Husbandry Act 1960. prevention of cruelty to animals (59 of 1960) and also being contrary to the freedom and constitutional rights guaranteed by Section 19 (1) (g) and Section 21 of the Constitution of India to citizens Indians in general and to the members of the applicant association in particular. Khurshid argued that their petition was still pending before the Supreme Court.

The association in its petition sought to be joined to the case before the high court to bring out all the necessary aspects from the point of view of the rights and sufferings of pet shop owners.

The plea filed through Advocate Supriya Juneja calls on the Delhi government and the Delhi Animal Welfare Board to audit all pet shops in Delhi and take necessary steps to ensure strict compliance with cruelty prevention rules Animals (Pet Shop), 2018 and the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act 1980.

The plea further called for the speedy formation and functioning of a Council of State under the 2018 rules and the formation of a committee headed by a retired High Court judge to oversee that the Council of State enforces the law and from the 2018 rules. The plea also called on the defendants to conduct an awareness campaign and clarify the process for registering pet stores.

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Falcon tradition inspires passion in World Cup host Qatar https://budgies-paradise.com/falcon-tradition-inspires-passion-in-world-cup-host-qatar/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 16:55:26 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/falcon-tradition-inspires-passion-in-world-cup-host-qatar/ DOHA, Qatar (AP) — Qatar has become a focal point for football since winning the right to host the World Cup. But another sport is flying high in the historic center of the capital, Doha, as more than a million foreign fans flock to the tiny emirate: falconry. In bustling Souq Waqif, a century-old market […]]]>

DOHA, Qatar (AP) — Qatar has become a focal point for football since winning the right to host the World Cup. But another sport is flying high in the historic center of the capital, Doha, as more than a million foreign fans flock to the tiny emirate: falconry.

In bustling Souq Waqif, a century-old market maze in Doha, shops selling spices and souvenirs give way to shops – and even a state-of-the-art hospital – filled with the famous birds that have long inspired passion among Bedouin tribes.

For centuries, Arabs across the region have used hawks to hunt and recited poems extolling their virtues. Today, the birds of prey serve as powerful reminders of Qatari culture and tradition even as the skyscraper-studded city prepares for the world’s biggest sporting event.

“Of course, football is the mother of sport. But besides football, there are other very important sports that we want foreigners to understand about Qatar,” said Khalid al-Kaja, a falconer from A 45-year-old from rural Syria who moved to Doha with his family more than two decades ago to raise the bird.“The way we treat falcons says a lot about our relationship with the desert, with nature. This brings us back to the basics of life.

Eager fans from around the world descended on Souq Waqif on Saturday, a day before the World Cup opening ceremony, braving Doha’s piercing autumn sun to wander through the stalls of perfumes and incense and check the stock of parrots and lovebirds.

In a dark alley, al-Kaja expressed hope that the World Cup spotlight would boost global appreciation for the ancient hobby he has devoted his life to. Lines of falcons, tied to perches, were waiting to be appraised on Saturday. For Qatari customers, raptors are beloved pets, status symbols and fierce hunters.

“Qatar has this new infrastructure, the buildings, everything,” al-Kaja said, referring to the $200 billion the energy-rich country has poured into the soccer tournament, building vast air-conditioned stadiums, swanky hotels and even a subway. system to take fans around the city. Just north of historic Souq Waqif, the skyscrapers of West Bay shimmered.

“But we don’t forget the past. Falconry is a passion that brings the whole region together,” al-Kaja said.

In recent years, the popularity of falconry has skyrocketed, he added, as Qatari citizens and longtime Arab residents see the growing value of cultural relics from a time even before the emirate. is even a country, let alone a hub of natural gas wealth and international business. .

Falcon clubs, beauty contests and races have sprung up in the Qatari desert and across the Arabian Peninsula, sending falcon prices soaring, traders say. The finest shops in al-Kaja sell for up to 1 million Qatari riyals ($274,680), he said.

Nowhere is the love of falcons more evident than at Souq Waqif Falcon Hospital in Doha, a medical facility devoted entirely to the treatment and care of birds. Surgeons repair broken hawk bones, file their excessively long fingernails, and perform full-body X-rays of the birds.

But even among the hawk-crazed, excitement over the World Cup – the first ever in the Arab world – looms large. A Qatari falconer, Masnad Ali Al Mohannadi, presents his beloved bird, named Neyar, as a medium capable of choosing the winners of World Cup matches.

Earlier this week in Al Khor, about 50 kilometers (30 miles) north of Doha, he tied pigeon meat to the flags of Qatar and Ecuador – the teams that will kick off the tournament sunday. Two drones shot the flags in the sky. As they floated above their heads, Al Mohannadi, dressed in his aviator sunglasses and traditional white dress, asked his falcon to choose the winner.

“Go for Qatar, go for Qatar!” he begged, releasing his bird into the clear desert air. Neyar rushed to the flag of Qatar. But a moment later, the raptor dove in the opposite direction, attacking meat wrapped in Ecuador’s national colors.

“He chose Ecuador,” Al Mohannadi said. Disappointment passed over his face. “God willing, Qatar will win.”

___

Associated Press writers Nebi Qena and Srdjan Nedeljkovic contributed to this report.

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🔒 10 things to do this weekend in Metro Detroit https://budgies-paradise.com/%f0%9f%94%92-10-things-to-do-this-weekend-in-metro-detroit/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 20:55:16 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/%f0%9f%94%92-10-things-to-do-this-weekend-in-metro-detroit/ DETROIT – The holidays are in full swing in Detroit with the opening of the Monroe Street Midway and markets. 10 things to do this weekend in Metro Detroit The holidays are in full swing in Detroit with the opening of the Monroe Street Midway and markets. Downtown Detroit Markets (Cadillac Square), Wednesday through Sunday: […]]]>

DETROIT – The holidays are in full swing in Detroit with the opening of the Monroe Street Midway and markets.

10 things to do this weekend in Metro Detroit

The holidays are in full swing in Detroit with the opening of the Monroe Street Midway and markets.

Downtown Detroit Markets (Cadillac Square), Wednesday through Sunday: Cadillac Square has transformed into the city’s vacation hub with a curated collection of 18 Detroit vendors where you can find specialty gifts, home decor, pet supplies, books and more. The row of holiday shops will lead you directly to the Cadillac Lodge, a wintry indoor hangout for the ultimate cozy ambience that offers hot chocolate and treats. More info here.

Monroe Street Midway, opens Friday: The winter edition of the popular outdoor spotlight will be your family’s new winter tradition. Right in the heart of downtown Detroit, you can enjoy a 20-foot arctic slide, winter bumper cars, winter puck putt, and delicious treats. The Midway is free to attend. Some activities require paid entry. Santa Claus will start making appearances later in the season. More info here.

Novi Pet Expo (Suburban collection show), Friday to Sunday: Looking for your new best friend? Join the celebration of all things furry, feathered and finned! From pet costume contests to sausage dog races and even canine stars of America’s Got Talent, this show has everything you need for your pets. Tickets are $12 for children 12 and older, $7 for 11 and under. Children 3 and under and pets are free. More info, timetables and tickets here.

Ford Free Playful Learning Weekend (Michigan Science Center), Saturday and Sunday: Discover, learn and play when the Michigan Science Center opens for free this weekend for the whole family. Special activities and experiences will be available. Access includes Mi-Sci’s latest exhibit: Level Up with Electric Playhouse Travels. Mi-Sci members can get early entry tickets. Reservations required. Book here.

Royal Oak Vodka Fest (Farmers Market), Saturday from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.: Shaken, stirred or pure? Here’s your chance to sample dozens of the best vodkas from around the world, including local brands. Meet brand ambassadors who will guide you through the tasting experience and give you insight into each flavor. General admission includes 10 samples. 21 and over only. Tickets are $45. More info and tickets here.

Faust (Detroit Opera), Saturday 7:30 p.m.: Would you make a pact with the devil? Experience the classic 1859 opera in a whole new way. Directed by Lincoln Center Theater Resident Director Lileana Blain-Cruz, Faust is updated with a modern version and features restored music and scenes that have never been played. Tickets start at $29. Program and tickets here.

Ladies Night (Fox Theatre), Saturday 8 p.m.: Oh what a night! Break out the champagne and enjoy the sweet sounds of R&B hitmakers Bobby Brown, Joe, El DeBarge and NEXT. Listen to hits like ‘My Prerogative’, ‘Stutter’, ‘Who’s Johnny’ and more. Get tickets here.

Big Bird Run (Reacreation Authority Center, Roseville), Sunday 10 a.m.: The 44th annual race will take you through Gration Ave., I-696 and several residential streets. Choose from a fun 10k, 5k or 1 mile run. Registration is still available. Proceeds go to community organizations that help local families in need. More info and registration here.

All Things Detroit Holiday Experience (Eastern Market, Shed 5), Sunday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.: Get a head start on your shopping with the Popular Market Holiday Edition. Shop from over 200 local small businesses and vendors offering holiday-themed crafts, food and gifts. Tickets are $5 at the door or $10 online, allowing for early entry. List of suppliers here.

Reeve Carney (Chrysler Black Box), Sunday 4:30 p.m. and 6:45 p.m.: Of Hadesville at Motown, Reeve Carney brings his signature Broadway sound to an intimate cabaret here in Detroit. Carney was the first Peter Parker in Spider Man on Broadway and is the original and current Orpheus in the hit musical Hadesville, now in its third year on the Great White Way. He will sing a collection of Broadway hits traditionally sung by the biggest divas on stage. Two performances only. Get tickets here.

Find more events with our Live Guide calendar here.

Copyright 2022 by WDIV ClickOnDetroit – All Rights Reserved.

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Cockatiel bird on train leaves commuters perplexed https://budgies-paradise.com/cockatiel-bird-on-train-leaves-commuters-perplexed/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 12:59:24 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/cockatiel-bird-on-train-leaves-commuters-perplexed/ The medium-sized parrot’s name is Shadow. “He is three years old and had a brother, but he was killed by a cat,” his owner tells us. The unusual pair take regular trains in the Westmeath and Roscommon areas on the Dublin-Mayo train line. “The train staff and conductors turn a blind eye to me as […]]]>

The medium-sized parrot’s name is Shadow. “He is three years old and had a brother, but he was killed by a cat,” his owner tells us. The unusual pair take regular trains in the Westmeath and Roscommon areas on the Dublin-Mayo train line.

“The train staff and conductors turn a blind eye to me as they brine him on board and naturally he gets on for free,” smiled Shadow’s owner.

The man brings a bag of small nuts to feed Shadow, and also ties him up with a small leash to keep him from flying away. Shadow also enjoys looking out the window at the passing landscape, and perhaps other birds in the wild.

Two years ago, a supermarket in Dublin apologized to panto queen Twink after banning her from bringing her Timberlake cockatiel into their store. Twink, real name Adele King, regularly carried his pet bird on his shoulder to various shops in the Knocklyon shopping centre.

Twink is regularly seen in SuperValu next to his house with his pet on his shoulder

SuperValu Knocklyon said they were sorry for “any embarrassment” they may have caused him. A spokesperson for the supermarket said at the time: “SuperValu Knocklyon would like to apologize for any confusion regarding our store’s beloved customer, Adele King.

“We would like to clarify that Mrs. King continues to be welcome in our store and that yesterday’s media coverage regarding her pet cockatiel is due to the store manager responding to a request to clarify our policy regarding the presence of animals in store.

‘It was not intended to cause embarrassment to Ms King, who is a long time and valued customer of Knocklyon staff, we apologize for any offense caused.’

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This is for the birds | The Jewish Norm https://budgies-paradise.com/this-is-for-the-birds-the-jewish-norm/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/this-is-for-the-birds-the-jewish-norm/ It’s hard for the die-hard among us to deny that birds are beautiful when soaring. The beauty of their flight brings joy in its wake. And sometimes peace comes with it. To understand how it worked in Israel, start by imagining an idyllic New England village. It’s fall, the leaves are at their peak, there’s […]]]>

It’s hard for the die-hard among us to deny that birds are beautiful when soaring. The beauty of their flight brings joy in its wake. And sometimes peace comes with it.

To understand how it worked in Israel, start by imagining an idyllic New England village. It’s fall, the leaves are at their peak, there’s a covered bridge over a stream, there’s a village green, and there’s an old barn in a meadow.

There are many partially hidden places in the old barn, and there’s an owl’s nest in one of those nooks.

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Migratory white storks fly over Israel; their flight is photographed from a motorized glider. (Thomas Krumenacker)

The barn owls living in this nest prey on rodents that would otherwise eat the crops. So less pesticides, more cereals, more owls, less mice. It’s a fairly well-balanced system.

But today there are fewer wooden barns, even in New England.

Now let’s take the story back to Israel; it’s not a place we associate with old wooden barns, and for good reason. Its agricultural industry is newer, the climate is different, and for various reasons the barns, like most barns built now, are more functional, less scenic, and less attractive to owls.

Like not appealing at all.

Hungry barn owls are eagerly waiting for their mother. They nest in one of the adapted boxes of ammo crates. (Amir Ezer)

So to bring this story back to this century and to connect it to Israel, we go to the Hula Valley in Israel, which was a lake surrounded by swamps, in northern Israel. It was a breeding ground for mosquitoes, and therefore for malaria. In the 1950s, with the blithe post-war misunderstanding that directly applied science can fix everything straightforwardly, and with the equally blithe disregard for the likelihood of unintended consequences, the lake was dried up.

There were fewer mosquitoes, and that was a very good thing. But the complex natural habitat that had thrived there, the web of interdependencies that provided the land and the people living near it with the natural resources they needed, dried up along with the lake.

In the 1990s, Israelis began trying to rebalance competing needs, bring back some of the species that once lived there, and restore some of the beauty. And there have been real successes there.

General Mansour Abu Rashid of Jordan, left, and Dr Yossi Leshem of Israel present the barn owl project to the president of Switzerland and the 150 ambassadors stationed there. (Professor Alex Roulin)

According to the Society for the Preservation of Nature in Israel – whose leaders hosted a Kaplen JCC discussion on the palisades in Tenafly last week – the country is a vital resting place for migratory birds. Twice a year, about 500 million birds—that’s 500,000,000, which is a lot of birds—pass through Israel from Europe and Asia, en route to Africa; once they go south, and the next time they go back north. On their way south, the Hula Valley is their last stop before the huge desolate expanses of the Sahara; going up, the valley is the first place which offers them food and rest.

When the Hula Valley dried up, rodents still managed to survive there; farmers put pesticides to kill them. This pesticide also killed a large number of birds.

What to do?

Three pelicans fly to South Sudan. (Aharon Shimshon)

Yossi Leshem, who was among the speakers at the JCC, is a former boss of the SPNI. He is a tremendously accomplished and credentialed ornithologist; he is, among other things, a senior researcher in the Department of Zoology at Tel Aviv University and founder and director of the university’s joint project with SPNI, the International Center for the Study of Bird Migration.

He thought about how to solve the problem of pesticides and birds in the 1980s. “In Malaysia, they were cutting down hundreds of thousands of hectares of rainforest to plant olive trees, and suddenly they started to push a lot of rats on the trees.” Turns out rats aren’t much better for olive trees than pesticides are for birds, but the Malaysians had a great idea. “They put up nesting boxes for the owls, which reduced the number of rats,” Dr. Leshem said.

He realized that owls could also work in Israel, if he could find a way to provide them with nests.

“We started in the Beit She’an Valley,” also in northern Israel, on the Jordan River, “in 1983,” Dr Leshem said. “At first we thought maybe we should bring pairs of barn owls – we had too many at the zoo anyway – but very quickly we learned we didn’t have to bring them.”

A hoopoe – Israel’s national bird – feeds its chicks. (Thomas Krumanrcker)

Barn owls eat between 2,000 and 6,000 rodents a year, said Jay Shofet, director of partnerships and development at SPNI; Mr. Shofet also spoke at the JCC.

If people provided nesting boxes, the owls showed up. “Now we have 5,000 boxes,” Dr. Leshem said. And it’s no problem for the owls to find enough to eat. “Farmers who have boxes have stopped using pesticides,” he said.

“The boxes cover over 350,000 acres,” Shofet added.

A common kingfisher is on the hunt. (Angel Shmulik)

They stand in the fields like inverted scarecrows; instead of scaring birds away from crops, they shelter feeding birds from crop-demolishing rodents, not only keeping themselves well fed, but helping other birds stay safe.

It was quite easy for SPNI to find wooden crates, he added. “The Israeli army donated thousands of wooden ammunition boxes. Every soldier knows that. We just put them on poles.

Owls seem to have a sophisticated sense of prey availability, Dr Leshem said. In years when rodents thrive, owls have more fledglings. “They can have up to 14 chicks, and maybe even a second and sometimes even a third cycle” of laying. Less prey means fewer chicks. “Sometimes they only have one or two eggs, and some years some don’t have any at all.”

What rodents do they eat? Mice, of course. There are no squirrels in Israel, Dr. Leshem said, and rats do not eat crops. Owls also eat nutria, and — wait! — gerbils. You know, the lazy pets kids have when their parents won’t let them have a cat or a dog.

On October 26, 1994, Jordan and Israel signed a peace treaty, and General Mansour Abu Rashid was there; he is in the first row, on the left. Next to him, from left to right: Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, US President Bill Clinton and Jordanian Prime Minister Abdelsalam al-Majali. In the back, from left to right: the Israeli brigadier. General (Res.) Baruch Spiegel, US Secretary of State Warren Christopher, Israeli President Ezer Weizman and King Hussein of Jordan.

(However, owls don’t work as well in cities. Dr. Leshem said researchers have tried setting up boxes in urban areas, hoping the birds will prey on mice and rats, but they don’t. did not.)

There’s more to this story than how farmers were able to use fewer pesticides, not only saving the lives of many birds, but making the habitat healthier for all species, including humans. It has also led to cross-border partnerships.

In 2002, a group of retired Israeli and Jordanian generals visited the battlefields; it was about moving from war to peace. “I said I wanted to show them the boxes, but they said, ‘No! No. They are generals. They are not interested in wildlife. They gave me an hour to show them a box.

Seven barn owl chicks are in a nest box; the box is one of 5,000 scattered across Israel. (Amir Ezer)

It worked. They were interested.

One of these generals was Mansour Abu Rashid, who “was wounded during the Six Day War” – fighting for Jordan – “and was also captured by Israeli soldiers, but managed to escape. He also been injured in 1973,” Dr. Leshem said.

“And then he said that he had spent 35 years fighting the Israelis, but for 28 years he had been involved in peace.”

General Mansour, as Dr. Leshem affectionately calls him, is also a lawyer and former adviser to King Hussein of Jordan; he was there when Israel and Jordan signed their peace treaty in 1994. He was also at the JCC, on the SPNI panel.

This group of white storks resting and refueling in Israel are among the 600,000 storks that fly over Israel twice a year. That’s 85% of the world’s white storks. (Thomas Krumenacker)

Today, he is the founder and director of the Amman Center for Peace and Development, and he and Dr. Leshem work together to preserve nature and promote peace in their countries. They also became “very close friends,” Dr. Leshem said. “He comes to my house and I go to his house. We consider that working together now is not a matter of environmentalism but also a person-to-person activity.

When he first talked about the owls with Mr. Abu Rashid, Dr. Leshem said, the general said, “’Yossi, we can’t do this. Owls bring us luck. To Muslims.’ But I said this time the owls would bring good luck to all of us.

The barn owl nesting program has spread from Israel and Jordan to Cyprus, Greece, Morocco, Dubai and Switzerland, Shofet said, and he believes other countries are likely to adopt it as well.

This common swift is in flight; in a thousandth of a second, it will be sipping water — while still flying. (Angel Shmulik)

And then there is the bigger project.

Re-wild.

During the JCC panel, the group – moderated by Leon Sokol de Tenafly, co-chair of the American Friends of the Society for the Preservation of Nature in Israel, which sponsored the visit – explained how it works to convert fish farms into sites more natural. environments. Decades ago, kibbutzim turned wetlands into fish farms; wetlands brought disease and farmed fish brought income. But as the world has changed, farmed fish have become less financially profitable and fish farms are deteriorating.

SPNI has transformed one, at Kfar Ruppin, into a bustling destination for birds and other wildlife; he is working on a second, further south, at Kibbutz Ma’agan Michael.

This is not new; the project is progressing well. This brought large numbers of birds to the new, clean wetlands which replaced the fish farms.

The news is political. Although it’s not quite official yet, it looks like Jordan will be working with Israel on regenerating the wetlands, so that the wetlands facing each other across the Jordan can attract birds and wildlife. terrestrial fauna together. It’s not like these species understand, care, or are bounded in any way by political boundaries. And we humans can learn from them.

To learn more about SPNI, visit natureisrael.org.

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Lucky duck owners have found a rare pet that has attracted birdwatchers to Harlingen https://budgies-paradise.com/lucky-duck-owners-have-found-a-rare-pet-that-has-attracted-birdwatchers-to-harlingen/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 23:13:54 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/lucky-duck-owners-have-found-a-rare-pet-that-has-attracted-birdwatchers-to-harlingen/ HARLINGEN, Texas (ValleyCentral) — For a few weeks, a rare mandarin duck has been attracting flocks of people to Pendleton Park. Colorful and splashy, it waddled, swam and preened in front of birdwatchers and photographers who came to sneak a peek at the exotic fowl before it had a chance to fly away – or […]]]>

HARLINGEN, Texas (ValleyCentral) — For a few weeks, a rare mandarin duck has been attracting flocks of people to Pendleton Park.

Colorful and splashy, it waddled, swam and preened in front of birdwatchers and photographers who came to sneak a peek at the exotic fowl before it had a chance to fly away – or rather, to to dodge.

What few could have predicted, the lucky duck went off in true Texas style, riding a shotgun in a pickup truck on Saturday morning. But don’t worry, he wasn’t ab-duck-ted.

“I was contacted on Sunday evening by individuals whose duck was missing and they had seen it in [the news] about a mandarin duck,” Michael Gonzalez, game warden with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, told ValleyCentral.

A mandarin duck, spotted at Pendleton Park in Harlingen, was reunited with its owners in Harlingen, according to a Texas Parks and Wildlife Department game warden. (Central Valley)

Now reunited with its owners, the bird didn’t have to migrate far to find its home as it is owned by a Harlingen family.

“They were able to provide photos of themselves with the duck, actually of them holding the duck, and it was their home,” Gonzalez said. “It wasn’t an internet stock photo or anything.”

Initially, when the owners bought the duck, its wings were clipped, the game warden said.

“But ducks molt and their wings grow. So he had the ability, so he got out of them [yard]”, González said.

However, before retrieving their pet, the Harlingen family wanted to take all necessary steps to work with TPWD officials, in case retrieving their pet ruffles someone’s feathers. After all, the duck had been nestling in the media center and waddling into the watchful eyes of an admiring audience since escaping from his backyard.

“They knew from the start, because they are avid birders themselves,” Gonzalez said. “They knew and said, ‘That’s why we’re calling you because we don’t want to get in trouble for picking up our duck. “”

The game warden confirmed that state and federal rules do not prohibit them from possessing the duck, which is banded on one leg, and that no law would prevent them from retrieving it from the park. He met the owners at Pendleton Park on Wednesday.

A view of Pendleton Park in Harlingen, Texas. (Central Valley)

“The owners were reluctant to take [the duck home] because there were a lot of people there taking pictures of the duck and showing interest,” Gonzalez said. “And they were like, ‘Now we feel like the bad guys are coming to take our duck.

Some of those people that day had come all the way to Corpus Christi and another from out of state, Gonzalez said. So the owners decided to leave the duck for a few more days and let people take the opportunity to see it and take pictures.

“They respect that people enjoy taking pictures of these animals and wanted to give people the opportunity to do so,” the game warden said. “With a few more days, however, more people heard about it and more people showed up.”

Gonzalez confirmed the owners picked up the duck on Saturday. The owners had the opportunity to speak with ValleyCentral but were not immediately available for comment.

“These people did everything the right way,” Gonzalez said. “Rather than going out there and grabbing it, they wanted to make sure they covered all their bases.”

That is, they wanted to have all their ducks in a row.

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Petco and Nationwide join forces to provide insurance and care for more pets https://budgies-paradise.com/petco-and-nationwide-join-forces-to-provide-insurance-and-care-for-more-pets/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/petco-and-nationwide-join-forces-to-provide-insurance-and-care-for-more-pets/ Petco’s fully integrated ecosystem of pet health and wellness solutions – including its more than 1,500 Petco Pet Care Centers – and Nationwide’s in-depth claims data set, as well as pet protection and insurance capabilities will be the focus of comprehensive programs expected to be available in 2023. With the ability to cross-promote and market […]]]>

Petco’s fully integrated ecosystem of pet health and wellness solutions – including its more than 1,500 Petco Pet Care Centers – and Nationwide’s in-depth claims data set, as well as pet protection and insurance capabilities will be the focus of comprehensive programs expected to be available in 2023. With the ability to cross-promote and market to each other’s customer base and beyond. Beyond that, pet-serving businesses will leverage their collective infrastructure, expertise, and more than 150 years of information from a rapidly growing customer base of more than 25 million pet families.

“Receiving the lifelong medical support pets need is essential for pets and their families,” said Petco SVP Omnichannel Customer Experience, Jenny Wolski. “The personalized, data-driven pet insurance solutions we are developing in partnership with Nationwide will be designed to expand families’ access to Petco’s full suite of pet care services, giving them a longer, healthier life together.”

Ongoing veterinary care is essential to the overall health and well-being of pets and helps them live long, happy and healthy lives. Pet insurance plays an important role in helping families say “yes” to care they couldn’t otherwise afford, yet only about 2.5% of pets in the United States are estimated to be insured, according to 2021 data from the North American Pet Health Insurers Association (NAPHIA). A 2021 Nationwide-sponsored VetSuccess study found that Nationwide-insured dogs and cats visited vets 73% and 43% more often, respectively, than pets without health insurance.

“Forty years ago, Nationwide issued the first pet health insurance policy in the United States for Television’s Lassie. Every year since, more customers have trusted us to protect their pets than any another insurer focused on innovation – including being the first to offer voluntary employee benefit plans, avian and exotic coverage, telehealth and preferential pricing on prescription drugs,” said the President and CEO. of Nationwide Pet Insurance. Heidi Sirota. “Our partnership with Petco is another groundbreaking initiative that will reshape the pet care industry by expanding access to care, providing actionable health insights and improving outcomes for millions of pets. company and their families.”

These new offerings are expected to focus on end-to-end pet care provided by Petco’s pharmacy, veterinary hospitals or clinics, and other health and wellness offerings, including Petco’s Revolutionary System Vital care program. Coverage will include routine preventative care such as vaccinations and unforeseen medical needs related to accidents or serious illnesses. Petco insurance offerings available to Petco customers and partners (employees) are expected to be provided exclusively by National Pet Insurance in the future.

“With an increasing number of pets in American homes, and their loving families’ need and desire that they live as healthy and happy lives as possible, expanding pet parents’ access to the care that support all elements of a pet’s overall health – including access to veterinary care as well as physical, mental, social and home health – is a key part of the focus of Petco on goal-driven performance,” said Dr. Whitney Miller, DVM, MBA, DACVPM and Chief Veterinarian at Petco. “Nationwide’s proven track record of providing extraordinary care for millions of pets is perfectly aligned with our mission to improve lives. Through our combined efforts focused on what’s best for pets insurance, we aim to streamline the pet insurance process not only for our customers, but for the veterinarian community as a whole.”

Source: 2021-2022 National Pet Ownership Survey by the American Pet Products Association (APPA).

About Petco, The Health + Wellness Co.:

Founded in 1965, Petco is a category-defining health and wellness company focused on improving the lives of pets, pet parents, and our own Petco Partners. We have consistently set new standards in pet care while providing comprehensive pet wellness products, services and solutions, and building communities that deepen the pet-pet bond. . We operate over 1,500 pet care centers across the United States, Mexico and Porto Rico, which offer merchandise, pets, grooming, training and a growing network of on-site veterinary hospitals and mobile veterinary clinics. Our comprehensive pet health and wellness ecosystem is accessible through our Pet Care Centers and digitally on petco.com and the Petco App. In tandem with Petco Love (formerly the Petco Foundation), an independent, non-profit organization, we work with and support thousands of local animal welfare groups across the country and, through in-store adoption events, we’ve helped find homes for over 6.5 million animals.

About National Pet Insurance

With over 1.1 million pets insured, Nationwide is the first and largest provider of pet health insurance in United States. National pet health insurance plans cover dogs, cats, birds, and exotic animals for multiple medical issues and conditions related to accidents, illnesses, and injuries. Medical plans are available in all 50 states and District of Colombia. Products underwritten by Veterinary Pet Insurance Company (CA), Columbus, Ohio; National Casualty Company (all other states), Columbus, Ohio. Registration Agency: DVM Insurance Agency. All are subsidiaries of the Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. Pet owners can find National Pet Insurance on Facebook or follow on Twitter. For more information on National Pet Insurance, call 800-UNITED STATES-PETS (800-872-7387) or visit petinsurance.com.

About Nationwide

Nationwide, a Fortune 100 company based in Columbus, Ohiois one of the largest and strongest diversified insurance and financial services organizations in the United States. Nationwide is rated A+ by Standard & Poor’s. An industry leader in customer-focused innovation, Nationwide offers a full suite of insurance products and financial services, including auto, business, home, farm and life insurance; public and private sector pension plans, annuities, mutual funds and ETFs; excess & excess, specialty and surety; animal, motorcycle and boat insurance. For more information, visit www.nationwide.com. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Nationwide, Nationwide is on your side, and Nationwide N and Eagle are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. © 2022.

Caution Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, regarding expectations, beliefs, plans, objectives, goals, strategies, future events or performance and underlying assumptions and other statements other than statements of historical fact. Although Petco believes that the expectations and assumptions reflected in these statements are reasonable, there can be no assurance that such expectations will prove to be correct. Forward-looking statements are subject to numerous risks and uncertainties, including risk factors that Petco identifies in its filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, and actual results may differ materially from the results discussed in such forward-looking statements. Petco undertakes no obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statements it may make, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law, regulation or other relevant legal authority. requires it.

Petco Media Contact:
Ventura Olvera
[email protected]

National media contact:
Karen Davis
[email protected]

SOURCE Petco Health and Wellness Company, Inc.

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Mayor’s Office – News – Articles – October 2022 – New Orleans Mosquito, Termite and Rodent Control Council to Conduct Adult Mosquito Reductions Tonight https://budgies-paradise.com/mayors-office-news-articles-october-2022-new-orleans-mosquito-termite-and-rodent-control-council-to-conduct-adult-mosquito-reductions-tonight/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 19:42:36 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/mayors-office-news-articles-october-2022-new-orleans-mosquito-termite-and-rodent-control-council-to-conduct-adult-mosquito-reductions-tonight/ October 21, 2022 | From the city of New Orleans The New Orleans Mosquito, Termite and Rodent Control Council will conduct adult mosquito reductions tonight NEW ORLEANS – The New Orleans Mosquito, Termite and Rodent Control Board (NOMTRCB) will be conducting adult mosquito reductions tonight, weather permitting, in the following locations: Algiers/Aurora/Behrman within the […]]]>

October 21, 2022 | From the city of New Orleans

The New Orleans Mosquito, Termite and Rodent Control Council will conduct adult mosquito reductions tonight

NEW ORLEANS – The New Orleans Mosquito, Termite and Rodent Control Board (NOMTRCB) will be conducting adult mosquito reductions tonight, weather permitting, in the following locations:

  • Algiers/Aurora/Behrman within the area bounded by Woodland Drive, General Meyer Avenue, Shirley Drive and General DeGaulle Drive
  • Algiers/Tall Timbers in the area bounded by Lennox Avenue, King’s Canyon Drive, the Algiers Canal and General DeGaulle Drive
  • Algiers within the area bounded by General DeGaulle Drive, Behrman Highway and Behrman Place
  • New Orleans East/East Village area bounded by I-10, I-510, Chef Menteur Highway and Bayou Sauvage

Mosquito control activities tonight will target Culex quinquefasciatus, the main vector of West Nile virus (WNV) in the parish of Orléans. The virus continues to circulate in local mosquitoes despite an overall reduction in mosquito numbers in recent weeks. The NOMTRCB urges residents to reduce the risk of mosquito bites by using EPA-registered and CDC-approved mosquito repellents when outdoors, especially at night when mosquitoes carrying WNV are the most active.

Although it hasn’t rained recently, mosquitoes can breed in a small amount of water, and breeding sites can be well hidden. The Commission asks residents to check the areas around the house and yard at least once a week and to return all containers with water. Make sure rain barrels are covered with wire netting or treated with screens. Turn over children’s toys, water tables and swimming pools when not in use. Empty and replace water from outdoor pet dishes frequently. Scrub the sides of containers and fountains to remove mosquito eggs. Report standing water, unmaintained fountains and pools, construction sites holding water and spilled tires to 311.

Please review and follow additional guidance for home and personal protection.

Protect yourself

  • Reduce exposure to mosquitoes by limiting outdoor activities between dusk and dawn.
  • Use air conditioning or sit in the draft of a fan outside when possible
  • Make sure window and door screens are in good condition to prevent mosquitoes from getting inside the house.
  • Use CDC-approved repellents that contain EPA-registered active ingredients such as DEET, picaridin, IR3535, or oil of lemon eucalyptus.
  • When using a repellent, always follow the recommendations on the product label.

Protect your home

  • Eliminate standing water where mosquitoes breed around your home and yard by tipping all outdoor containers at least once a week.
  • Make sure pools and fountains are functional and flowing.
  • Remove trash and clutter and return any items that may contain water, such as kiddie pools, buckets, empty trash cans, children’s toys, or planters.
  • Change water weekly in containers that cannot be removed, such as birdbaths, pet water bowls, or non-functioning fountains.
  • Scrub the sides of the containers to remove any mosquito eggs that may have settled there.
  • Rain barrels and other water collection devices to have to be filtered and the water collected must be used within a week.
  • Aerate decorative ponds, fountains and sugar bowls, or fill them with fish or screens.

Report mosquito problems

Please report mosquito-related issues using one of the following methods:

For more information on West Nile virus, visit the CDC website:

https://www.cdc.gov/westnile/index.html

For pest control tips, reduction announcements and general information, follow NOMTRCB on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter @nolamosquito.

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‘Love again, song again, nest again, young again’ https://budgies-paradise.com/love-again-song-again-nest-again-young-again/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 09:40:00 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/love-again-song-again-nest-again-young-again/ Of the world’s 181 thrushes, only three reside in Bangladesh; and only orange-headed thrush lives in Dhaka city. Another Bangladeshi resident named Blue Whistling Thrush is a rare bird and only found in mountainous districts October 22, 2022, 3:40 p.m. Last modification: October 22, 2022, 3:44 p.m. Orange-headed thrush in search of food. Photo: Enam […]]]>

Of the world’s 181 thrushes, only three reside in Bangladesh; and only orange-headed thrush lives in Dhaka city. Another Bangladeshi resident named Blue Whistling Thrush is a rare bird and only found in mountainous districts

October 22, 2022, 3:40 p.m.

Last modification: October 22, 2022, 3:44 p.m.

Orange-headed thrush in search of food. Photo: Enam Ul Haque

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Orange-headed thrush in search of food. Photo: Enam Ul Haque

A colorful bird froze in a clammy scrub along the gutter as we rounded a corner on our morning walk threatened by an untimely drizzle. The bird, evidently, was a fearless orange-headed thrush rummaging through shrubbery and rubble in an attempt to find its breakfast. It was very unusual for this forest-dwelling bird to come to our bustling neighborhood of Banani.

The agile bird fluffs its feathers, perhaps, to shake the raindrops from its beautiful orange head and chest. Fortunately, the light drizzle had ceased; and the bursts of sunlight could strike the brushwood where the auburn bird stood silently. Its mottled russet underbelly looked like a small ornate quilt spread out in the autumn sun in anticipation of its winter use.

We were more than happy to find such a pretty bird in our seedy living quarters and didn’t want to scare off the unusual visitor. The bird stood perfectly still, as it usually does when intending to avoid detection. We had already stopped on our trail and continued to stand still, sincerely wishing the bird would ignore us and resume its search for breakfast.

Orange-headed thrush in search of food. Photo: Enam Ul Haque

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Orange-headed thrush in search of food.  Photo: Enam Ul Haque

Orange-headed thrush in search of food. Photo: Enam Ul Haque

The mystified Orange-headed Thrush might ignore us; but not the newsboy cycling towards the maquis from the other side. The alarmed bird leapt from the brush on the perimeter wall and fell into the vast meadow beyond the wall. We knew there would be plenty of breakfast for the hungry bird in that soggy field of grass.

The orange-headed thrush is an omnivorous bird that enjoys worms and insects as well as tender berries. Earthworms are by far his favorite food in Bangladesh; and it lives mostly worms in our Sal forests where berries are scarce. In the forests and woods of the villages, the thrush is usually found walking on the ground in search of wriggling worms.

Although it remains the only common resident thrush in Bangladesh, we see less and less orange-headed thrushes as earthworms disappear from our villages. In days of plenty, however, people didn’t notice too much of it because it has always been a very secretive bird like most thrushes in the world.

Of the world’s 181 thrushes, only three reside in Bangladesh; and only orange-headed thrush lives in Dhaka city. Another Bangladeshi resident named Blue Whistling Thrush is a rare bird and is found only in mountainous districts. The third resident thrush, Purple Cochoa, is a very rare bird from the Orient and has only been seen a few times in our country, including once at the Kurmitola golf course.

In addition to these three residents, 12 other species of thrush live in Bangladesh in winter. Only a handful of people have ever seen one of these stealthy visitors. The orange-headed thrush remains the only thrush that we can expect to see often in our neighborhood. Being an eastern species, it may never be seen in people’s backyards anywhere else in the world.

Orange-headed thrush singing. Photo: Enam Ul Haque

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Orange-headed thrush singing.  Photo: Enam Ul Haque

Orange-headed thrush singing. Photo: Enam Ul Haque

In the spring, the orange-headed thrush can be heard more often than seen. Like most thrushes, it sings soft, sweet songs and sometimes mimics other songbirds in Bangladesh. Alfred Tennyson, a Victorian Poet Laureate, wrote the following charming lines about a thrush, a harbinger of spring in his country:

Last year, you sang it just as willingly.

“New, new, new, new”! Is it so new

That you should sing so madly

‘Love again, song again, nest again, young again.’

The orange-headed thrush breeds in early summer in Bangladesh when passing showers send the worms crawling across the ground. Its nest is a large platform made of straws, grasses and leaves. Young and energetic thrushes may nest more than once per season, especially when the first nest is parasitized by the cuckoo.

Jacobin cuckoos and brown-winged cuckoos are known to lay eggs in orange-headed thrush nests. Only one egg is laid by the cuckoo in the thrush nest without damaging the thrush eggs. The cuckoo’s egg hatches first and the chick monopolizes the food brought by the thrush; and thrush chicks that hatch late unfortunately die of starvation.

However, the energetic orange-headed thrushes have not suffered from sneaky cuckoos laying eggs in their nests for donkey years. The population of thrushes has declined with the recent loss of forests and woodlands in the Orient. In Bangladesh, it also suffers from the massive destruction of worms and insects due to excessive use of pesticides.

Orange-headed thrush nesting. Photo: Enam Ul Haque

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Orange-headed thrush nesting.  Photo: Enam Ul Haque

Orange-headed thrush nesting. Photo: Enam Ul Haque

The orange-headed thrush is a popular cage bird in several eastern countries; and its population has recently declined in some of these countries. Fortunately, Bangladesh has strict laws against the trapping, trade and possession of wild birds; and very few thrushes have been caught here for the pet markets. The thrush can only blame us for our love of pesticides and our laziness in the field of forest conservation.

Hong Kong has recently demonstrated how the well-being of the Orange-headed Thrush is closely linked to that of forests and woodlands. The thrush is known to have first colonized Hong Kong in 1956. The population of thrushes has steadily increased along with the growth and maturation of the forests and woodlands of this small island.

Like the people of Hong Kong when we take care of our forests and woodlands, the Orange-headed Thrush in Bangladesh can also sing: “Love again, song again, nest again, young again.”

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Backyard chicken permits in Bethlehem head for vote amid law enforcement concerns over bird flu https://budgies-paradise.com/backyard-chicken-permits-in-bethlehem-head-for-vote-amid-law-enforcement-concerns-over-bird-flu/ Wed, 19 Oct 2022 21:10:00 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/backyard-chicken-permits-in-bethlehem-head-for-vote-amid-law-enforcement-concerns-over-bird-flu/ Bethlehem City Council is back on track for a vote allowing residents to keep chickens in their backyards. Council in committee Tuesday night voted 5-1 to seek a full council vote on rules to create a pilot scheme with 40 permits to keep backyard poultry. On July 19, Council introduced the proposal, then delayed the […]]]>

Bethlehem City Council is back on track for a vote allowing residents to keep chickens in their backyards.

Council in committee Tuesday night voted 5-1 to seek a full council vote on rules to create a pilot scheme with 40 permits to keep backyard poultry.

On July 19, Council introduced the proposal, then delayed the approval vote to learn more about concerns expressed by Mayor J. William Reynolds’ city administration and police. A new vote will take place once the proposed order is announced, council attorney Brian Panella said.

Bethlehem Health Director Kristen Wenrich and Deputy Police Chief Scott Meixell reiterated at Tuesday night’s meeting that they continue to have concerns about how permits will be approved, enforcement of rules that already strain city staff and the introduction of pet birds at a time when a highly contagious strain of bird flu is circulating among wild birds and domestic fowl in the United States.

“I think when we look at this ordinance, we’re introducing something where the risks far outweigh the minimal benefits that we’ll see from backyard chickens,” Wenrich said at a joint meeting of public safety and law enforcement committees. community and economic development of the council. .

Public Safety Chairwoman Councilwoman Rachel Leon cast the only vote against forwarding the proposal to the full council. Council President Michael Colón was absent.

Councilor Paige Van Wirt said she came up with the proposal in response to residents who had contacted her about a desire to raise their own eggs for food and keep chickens as part of maintenance of a garden and as pets. She researched how other cities inside and outside of Pennsylvania have adopted similar programs. After a year, Van Wirt said she would review the pilot program and speak with the animal control officer about complaints and other issues and look to strengthen the rules or repeal the ordinance if it doesn’t work. she said.

“These settings have had great success in other cities, even without the 40-co-op pilot program, so I think it’s a very reasonable way to try this for our community and see how it works out,” said said Van Wirt.

For a proposed fee of $25, residents could apply for one of 40 permits to keep up to six hens inside a chicken coop in the backyard of a single-family home or side-by-side home. at least 20 feet from habitable structures, 25 feet from any street and at least 5 feet from any property line.

No slaughter of chickens would be allowed. Additional regulations include ensuring chickens always have access to clean feed and water while prohibiting harmful conditions such as foul odors, flies, vermin and excessive noise. Violations could result in fines or confiscation of the chickens.

Tuesday night’s meeting was streamed live and available on YouTube.

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Kurt Bresswein can be reached at kbresswein@lehighvalleylive.com.

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