Song bird – Budgies Paradise http://budgies-paradise.com/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 08:16:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://budgies-paradise.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-41-150x150.png Song bird – Budgies Paradise http://budgies-paradise.com/ 32 32 Bird Watching: In Search of Endemic Species on a Trip to Puerto Rico https://budgies-paradise.com/bird-watching-in-search-of-endemic-species-on-a-trip-to-puerto-rico/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 08:00:22 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/bird-watching-in-search-of-endemic-species-on-a-trip-to-puerto-rico/ Puerto Rican parrots huddle in a flight cage at the Iguaca Aviary in El Yunque, Puerto Rico. Only about 100 of these birds exist in the wild with another 450 held in a captive breeding program. Carlos Giusti/Associated Press This column is the second of two chronicling a four-day birding trip my wife and I […]]]>

Puerto Rican parrots huddle in a flight cage at the Iguaca Aviary in El Yunque, Puerto Rico. Only about 100 of these birds exist in the wild with another 450 held in a captive breeding program. Carlos Giusti/Associated Press

This column is the second of two chronicling a four-day birding trip my wife and I took to Puerto Rico in May.

I take this opportunity to discuss some of the general characteristics of island birds. In the last column, we saw that island species diversity is generally lower in mainland source populations. We have also seen that exotic species have an easier time establishing themselves on islands, especially in disturbed areas.

Today’s column will focus on organisms that are restricted to one or a few islands. These species are qualified as endemic by biogeographers.

It is easy to see how endemic species can appear. A few individuals of a mainland species arrive on an island and over time diverge from the mainland species. Sometimes these endemic species are found only on the island where they appeared. In other cases, endemic species may disperse to neighboring islands.

For example, the great grackle is found on the four islands of the Greater Antilles but nowhere else. Similarly, the Lesser Antillean Bullfinch is found over most of the Lesser Antilles.

Island endemics are restricted to a single island. Puerto Rico has 17 endemic species and these were the main targets of our trip.

Most Puerto Rican endemic birds are widespread and common. We had some time for bird watching in the afternoon we arrived. At Bosque Estatal de Cambalache, our first endemic species was a Puerto Rican cuckoo lizard, with a lizard in its beak! We found Puerto Rican bullfinches and Puerto Rican spindalis (a relative of the tanager).

By moving to a suburb of Barcelonata, we hit the jackpot. We saw the Puerto Rican Flycatcher, Green Mango (a hummingbird), Puerto Rican Oriole, Adelaide Warbler and Puerto Rican Woodpecker.

After a hearty dinner, we stopped at a small stretch of forest in Manati where our guide Julio Salgado had staked a Puerto Rican owl. He responded quickly to a check-in and we got some great looks via a headlamp.

It was a great start to our trip. A total of three hours of birding produced nine of the 17 island endemics.

We started birding early the next day at Bosque Estatal de Rio Abajo. The region soon produced three other endemic species: the Puerto Rican vireo, the Puerto Rican emerald (a hummingbird), and the Puerto Rican tody. Todies are charming birds. Green on top with a red throat and a long, slender beak, these fiery birds are not much larger than a hummingbird and fly with the same speed and abandon.

But the main reason to visit this site was to find the Puerto Rican parrot. Only about 100 of these birds exist in the wild with another 450 held in a captive breeding program. A flock of eight parrots landed near us and I was able to take some great pictures. None of the birds pictured had bands, indicating that they were born in the wild. Good news!

With 13 endemics in the bag, we headed to the southwestern part of the island. A stop at a mountain site produced two endemic targets. The Elfin Woods warbler looks like a particularly dark black and white warbler. Puerto Rican birds were not recognized as a separate species until 1972.

We also saw my most desired species, the Puerto Rican Tanager. Although it has dull plumage and a weak song, I find it fascinating because it has come a long way from its continental ancestor. DNA evidence helps classify this bird into its own family, a single-species family.

We obtained our last two endemic species in the town of Lajas. The red-winged blackbird is an endangered species with only about 1000 extant individuals. Brood parasitism by shiny cowbirds is a major threat. We saw about 50 blackbirds in a mangrove thicket.

After dark, we visited the same mangroves and found a Puerto Rican nightjar to wipe the slate clean of all Puerto Rican endemics.

A full list of the species we saw and photos of many of them can be found at ebird.org/tripreport/57209

Herb Wilson taught ornithology and other biology courses at Colby College. He welcomes comments and questions from readers to [email protected]


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Calm in the Woods – Garden & Gun https://budgies-paradise.com/calm-in-the-woods-garden-gun/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 07:25:22 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/calm-in-the-woods-garden-gun/ Artwork: Dawn Yang He tells me to go where the path forks, settle down there in the corner. From here, he said, I could see both lanes: the right leading to an old food patch, the left ending in bedding. Deer, he says, are likely to come from anywhere. So I slip in mid-afternoon two […]]]>

Artwork: Dawn Yang

He tells me to go where the path forks, settle down there in the corner. From here, he said, I could see both lanes: the right leading to an old food patch, the left ending in bedding. Deer, he says, are likely to come from anywhere.

So I slip in mid-afternoon two hours before the evening movement. I find the place he described and slip into a grove of glumes and green heather where I will be hidden in a chair on the ground. I can see in the right lane where the trail turns into a fallow opening. But on the left side I can only see thirty yards from a bend, and after that’s where I convince myself the deer will be.

The problem is that I don’t know anything about white-tailed deer. I have never killed any. I’ve never seen them in the woods while hunting them. I come from small game, hunting dogs with kennels of crazy rabbit beagles, old men who raised squirrel dogs and Savage 24s. For the most part I was raised by fishermen. No one hunted deer except for a great-uncle who lived across the state.

But the man who sent me to this corner, he knows the deer and knows this place, which is to say, of course, I should listen. Instead, I pick up my chair and slide around the bend. I fall back against a stocky cedar that brushes against me against a pine. Now I can see all the way to the end of the lane. About an hour before sunset, footsteps are heard behind me. The sound is way back, so I peek over my shoulder and see her. She’s a young doe, probably eighty pounds, her coat smooth and as tan as an acorn. Head down, she nibbles the grass, then raises her eyes and ears alert. She looks where she comes from, takes a few steps and continues to feed.

Artwork: Dawn Yang

I decide not to move until she passes me. The footsteps get louder and I stay still, my eyes almost closed, my heart pounding. At the last moment, I realize that I am sitting directly on a trail. Her head passes close enough to my right shoulder for me to touch her. I turn slightly as she enters my peripheral vision, and the sudden movement opens her eyes wide. The doe almost comes out of her skin, just a burst of muscle thundering off the ground and gone.

It’s the first deer I hunt and I don’t kill it. Instead, I tremble in amazement and wonder as she disappears. I realize at this point that if a man sits quietly enough, he can completely disappear.

* * *

The problem with dying is that there is no good time to do it. When the turkeys stop gobbling, the flatheads start biting. The catfish go extinct just as the doves begin to dive into the corn stubble fields. The doves disappear and the white-tailed deer rut begins. Season returns us to season, and we struggle in pursuit of the game we pursue.

I’m half kidding that it’s going to be a heart attack that gets me out of here. They’ll find me at the base of a tree with muddy gobbler marks etched into my body, or lying on a dock after being woken up by a clicker bait, the slow tick-tick-tick of a flathead taking the line until the spool is empty and the rod itself slips off the dock into oblivion. Anyone who knows me knows how much I love the outdoors. They ask me to accompany them on hikes, and sometimes I go. The thing is, they walk too fast, at least for me. They tend to talk too much. When I’m with them, I keep the beat and the conversation going because I know that’s expected, but I’m embarrassed by the way the woods die down around us. We are a glowing fire against a space that will not have us. Nothing dares to enter this light.

As we stumble, the deer hide and wait, the squirrels melt into the limbs they are holding on to, and the birds cease their song. What we have become part of does not want to be part of us. Deep down I want to tell whoever I’m with to sit down and be still, that we need to be quiet and treat this place like a church. I want to tell them that if we don’t, we will surely miss the sermon. But instead, I keep these things to myself lest I ruin their good time, and we in turn see nothing. The more time passes, the more I tend to go alone in the woods.

* * *

On hot days, the heat of the day pushes me ever deeper into the night. Midnight finds me alone on the water, the mountains of North Carolina silhouetted black against the sky. I scan the beam of a searchlight on the shore and search for eyes that will shine like copper coins. When the light finds them, the bullfrogs go into a trance that won’t stop as long as the light is steady. They cling to the shadows of the driftwood until I get close enough to play them in the cattails and reeds.

As the boat passes between the shores, I shine my light into the water and see sunfish sunk in swept sand craters. The fish tilts back and forth as if sleeping with fins gently waving like lullabies. A loud crack breaks the silence, and without turning on the light, I know a beaver has slapped its tail in warning. Above, blue-green nebulae hang like smoke amid the spangle, and I’m stunned to have missed this so far. Who could care more about what brought them here? I turn off the light and lie down on the seat of the jon boat, amazed.

In the fall, when the leaves peak and the trees cast their color on the ripples of the creek like an oil fire, I watch a brook trout rise in a whirlwind where the back of a stone breaks the current. A bow and arrow throw puts a Cahill in the air, and as the fly lands, I mend the wrist line to hold it there. The trout rises through a shimmer of mica, rolls over the fly and dips to a cobblestone bottom. I put the hook on and feel the weight.

After a few strips, the fish beats in the shallows by my boots. I kneel down and wet my hand, I take this wonderful thing on my fingers. Autumn is reflected on the sides, the colors blend like that of a sugar maple: green to goldenrod, tangerine to scarlet. The dark green back is swirled with linden marmorations and red spots haloed with pale blue crowns. There is a sunset painted on my palm.

Winter renders the landscape in pen and ink, and I’m in a tree waiting for a stag that won’t show up. A hornbeam of golden finches flies over the timber line and lands in the brush and bushy pines at the end of a clearcut. Slowly the birds are heading towards me, landing in places that suit them for reasons I don’t know.

I’m bundled up and I’m cold, which keeps me still. The shaft stand is in a walnut background solidly surrounded by dogwood. In an instant all the charm converges on this singular point. They cling to limbs like leaves and are so close to me that when I focus on a single bird, I can see feathery barbs and barbs, wisps as fine as a baby’s hair. My vision recedes and I am surrounded by a yellow too bright to be understood. The universe becomes one color, and I’m trapped within it.

* * *

Everything I know about beauty I learned with a cane or a rifle. For me, fishing and hunting were the mechanics that put me squarely in the thick of things. I don’t mean to suggest it’s the only way, just that without a plan, few people would climb twenty feet on a pine tree two hours before daylight. People are looking for vistas to catch sunrises. They go around the bends in the trails and come across black bears, surely a stroke of luck. But who else shivers cold in the darkness in a tree miles from any road or trail and waits when the blue mist melts from the saddle at first light? Photographers? Mad Men? Maybe. And if so, I’ll gladly share the woods with them.

What I love most about these mornings is flipping the switch when the world goes dark. You slip into a place in complete darkness and wait for the silence to end. You are there when the first bird cries and the second responds, when life suddenly springs from every space that offered the slightest shelter from the night. The only requirement is that you still hold on without flinching and that you don’t dare break the spell. As Wendell Berry wrote, “For a while [you] rest in the grace of the world, and [are] free.”

* * *

The pine groves were opened by fire, and spring began to emerge its green face from the ash and black. By summer, what’s been burned will fill up again, but for now there’s no cover or place to hide, so I crawl along a dry creek bed , praying the turkey wouldn’t see me approaching.

Morning has just turned from black to sapphire, and the bird is pounding its member again, a sound so loud and so close it crashes into me like thunder. I look over the edge of the bank to find a place to sneak within reach, and I see an old pine tree nearly a meter across that’s more than enough to hide me. I lean against the tree, my torso turned into a trunk, my legs apart on the ground scorched like exposed roots. Somehow I managed to get within fifty yards of where the gobbler is perched.

Illustration: Song Kang

The woods are waking up around me and I have to fight the urge to rush things. I wait a few minutes for the light to rise before I call, and when I do, it’s nothing loud or startling, just a subtle tree cry sent out by the bell of a trumpet. I’m not waiting for the answer. There is no wing flapping or downward flight, just gravity and the ground, the thud of the bird hitting the ground as it falls from the limb like a stone. He stands in the clearing and cranes his neck to study the overlapping shadows where the call comes from, but I’m caught in a dark hollow the light has yet to find, and no matter how hard he tries, he can’t. not see me. For the turkey, survival requires absolute certainty, and so the line of wood becomes its line of sand. He won’t come near.

A dogwood winter puts its breath out, each swallow a sound written like a score of smoke that hangs before it until the echo fades. He swells in the strut and rakes his wingtips through the frosty grass, his head drained icy white. For a long time, that was all that existed between us. I am a tree and he is a dancer. The sun takes an hour to crest the pines, to warm this icy blue dawn, and during this time it walks like eyes on a page, without taking a step in the margins.

As the first rays break through the treetops, I watch its feathers transform into stained glass, a fan backlit in bronze and barred, the outer curve fringed with gold. I can’t move and I don’t want to. This is where I would spend my eternity, heaven and earth in one place, though even as I breathe it I know it can’t last. As quickly as he came, he will go. There’s always the flip of the switch. The world is awash with miracles, and I’m grateful to just witness it.

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Birdwatching: Sulfur-bellied Warbler, a songbird with a distinctive, high-pitched call https://budgies-paradise.com/birdwatching-sulfur-bellied-warbler-a-songbird-with-a-distinctive-high-pitched-call/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 06:34:46 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/birdwatching-sulfur-bellied-warbler-a-songbird-with-a-distinctive-high-pitched-call/ The Yellow-bellied Warbler (Phylloscopus griseolus) is a songbird that likes to stay in rocky areas around old buildings, and is often seen crawling over tree trunks, walls or rocks. The bird is not one to sit quietly for long in one place. It moves stealthily from place to place, usually so as not to be […]]]>

The Yellow-bellied Warbler (Phylloscopus griseolus) is a songbird that likes to stay in rocky areas around old buildings, and is often seen crawling over tree trunks, walls or rocks. The bird is not one to sit quietly for long in one place. It moves stealthily from place to place, usually so as not to be noticed. Therefore, one must have the patience to observe and capture the Sulfur-bellied Warbler on camera. No one can escape its single-note high-pitched cry, a sure sign of this songbird’s presence in the vicinity.

As for the characteristics, the male and the female are similar. It measures 11 cm. The main identifying marks are the brown upperparts, eye stripe, supercilium with orange-yellow leading edge, absence of wingbars, and brownish-yellow (dirty yellow) underparts. Like other warblers, it gleans insects from small branches and leaves. The Sulfur-bellied Warbler is found in rocky hills and scrubby forest habitats.

The species is found in small groups and tends to forage low in vegetation, sometimes even jumping on the ground. They have a single note appeal.

Although Sulphur-bellied Warbler is classified as a winter visitor, some areas especially foothills of Morni, Chakkimod, Bhojnagar in Interstate Chandigarh Region (ISCR) also host this bird in summer. Its habitat is rocky areas around old buildings.

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I was lucky enough to counter the Yellow-bellied Warbler during winter and summer. I first observed this species in Khol-Hi-Raitan Wildlife Sanctuary nestled in the Morni Hills in March 2020 and in Chakkimod-Bhojnagar last week when the maximum temperature was above 41 degrees Celsius. The Chakkimod-Bhojnagar region is part of the Solan district of Himachal Pradesh. It is considered part of the ISCR.

Besides the Sulfur-bellied Warbler, there are six other warbler species in the ISCR.

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Ambulance: Michael Bay used the real California Highway Patrol https://budgies-paradise.com/ambulance-michael-bay-used-the-real-california-highway-patrol/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 16:08:44 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/ambulance-michael-bay-used-the-real-california-highway-patrol/ The lure of starring in a Michael Bay action movie is a powerful thing. Not just for established Hollywood stars, but also for public servants. Talk with Empire (the magazine’s latest issue is now on sale) on his latest high-octane thriller — Ambulance – the filmmaker known for creating explosive blockbusters recalled how he was […]]]>

The lure of starring in a Michael Bay action movie is a powerful thing. Not just for established Hollywood stars, but also for public servants. Talk with Empire (the magazine’s latest issue is now on sale) on his latest high-octane thriller — Ambulance – the filmmaker known for creating explosive blockbusters recalled how he was able to recruit real California Highway Patrol officers on the first day of principal photography.

“I see five highway patrols [cars] roll, and they all know who I am,” he said. “They’re like, ‘We love your movies, sir, let’s take some pictures. I’m like, ‘Yeah, we were just supposed to shoot some inserts of the ambulance rolling down the freeway. I’d love to put you in the movie. They’re going, ‘Really?’ [I say] ‘Yeah. When you’re in a chase, how do you do it? [They reply] “Well, we’ll play with him, we’ll move, we’ll change lanes.” I go, ‘Really? Impressive. So I’ll give you each a microphone and a walkie-talkie.'”

It turned out to be a stroke of genius on Bay’s part. As well as securing a chance to work with experienced veterans of real-world highway chases, he was also able to close the road for free via a maneuver known as “rolling block” in which “a car begins to sweep the whole freeway and the real cars stop and the freeway stops,” the director explained. “We’re racing 90 miles an hour on a live freeway. My assistant cameraman, the focus shooter, says, “This is awesome, this looks so real. This has been real. That’s how you get free production value.”

Based on the 2005 Danish film of the same name, Ambulance stars Jake Gyllenhaal (Spider-Man: Far From Home) and Yahya Abdul-Mateen II (watchmen) as two bank robbers who are forced to hijack a medical vehicle after a heist goes horribly wrong. As if being on the run wasn’t enough, the duo must also deal with an injured police officer and the paramedic (Godzilla vs. Kong‘s Eiza González) trying to save his life in the back of the van. The film is now streaming on Peacock.

After years of mentoring the multi-billionaire Transformers franchise along, Bay returned to its ’90s roots with a larger-than-life action movie grounded in stakes and relatable characters. “I think we fantasize about crime,” he added. That’s why crime is so interesting to watch in movies and on TV. We think, ‘What would it be like to get away with this? How would that be? Oh, I’d be smarter. How did you screw that one up? You know, I think we all plan crimes. ‘Are they still robbing banks? How do they get around all the Plexiglas? I love a good heist movie. I tried to keep it grounded and intense.”

Ambulance takes this whimsical reverie and projects it onto the big screen, showing us just how messy it would be in practice. “I’m used to shooting these big blockbusters where there’s a zinger at the end of the scene,” Bay said. “It doesn’t have that because it’s real. What I love is when you start putting the scenes together and putting [composer Lorne Balfe’s] clues on it, all of a sudden the tension begins to mount. And that’s what’s really cool. I trusted this movie. He doesn’t need to have a zinger. It just has to build slowly sometimes.”

The film was produced by Bay, William Sherak (Scream), Bradley J. Fischer (shutter island), James Vanderbilt (Murder Mystery), and Ian Bryce (the Transformers franchise). Michel Kasé (Songbird) and Marc Moran (Pet sematary) are executive producers. Chris Fedac (Mandrel) wrote the screenplay.

Ambulance is now available to stream on Peacock.

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[PHOTOS] New TV Roles for Javicia Leslie, Maggie Q and More https://budgies-paradise.com/photos-new-tv-roles-for-javicia-leslie-maggie-q-and-more/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/photos-new-tv-roles-for-javicia-leslie-maggie-q-and-more/ [PHOTOS] New TV Roles for Javicia Leslie, Maggie Q and MoreWhile we’re still recovering from this spring’s cancellation bloodbath (we’re looking at you, The CW!), TVLine is here to offer a positive perspective: The stars of some of those dearly departed shows are now free to take on exciting new roles on our other favorite comedies and dramas. TV Grim Reaper’s ax fell hard this […]]]> [PHOTOS] New TV Roles for Javicia Leslie, Maggie Q and More

While we’re still recovering from this spring’s cancellation bloodbath (we’re looking at you, The CW!), TVLine is here to offer a positive perspective: The stars of some of those dearly departed shows are now free to take on exciting new roles on our other favorite comedies and dramas.

TV Grim Reaper’s ax fell hard this year on shows such as B positive, the endgame and Swivelas well as a slew of CW dramas, including Batwoman, Dynasty and Roswell, New Mexico. Now that the dust has settled, TVLine is reviving our annual tradition of imaginative possible new gigs for cast members of recently canceled shows.

In the list below we found 17 hypothetical castings to shake things up on a host of returning series, including a legend of tomorrow as Bad love interest, a Roswell stranger to fix a Grey’s heart, and a our kind of people alum like new Resident doc.

Plus, we’ve found the perfect people to potentially help Reachkick ass like Talia al Ghul on Peacemaker, and conjure a new spirit upon Ghosts. The past month has also seen It’s us come to its conclusion, so we have something euphoric in mind for a certain vet from this NBC drama. (But again: these are dream TVLine team castings, not real news. Not yet anyway!)

Scroll down below to review our picks, then hit the comments to share the beloved faces. you want to get back on TV as soon as possible.

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Birdwatching: Sightings in Greater Newburyport and Beyond | New https://budgies-paradise.com/birdwatching-sightings-in-greater-newburyport-and-beyond-new/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/birdwatching-sightings-in-greater-newburyport-and-beyond-new/ These recent sightings are compiled by Sue McGrath of the Newburyport Birders. Report your sightings to Newburyport Birders at newburyportbirders@comcast.net or call 978-204-2976. Visit www.newburyportbirders.com for more information. Parker River National Wildlife Refuge, Plum Island: Acadian Flycatcher, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, Olive-sided Flycatcher, Green-winged Teal, Red Knot, Mourning Warbler, Black-capped Warbler, Warbling Vireo, Tricolored Heron, White-rumped Sandpiper, […]]]>

These recent sightings are compiled by Sue McGrath of the Newburyport Birders. Report your sightings to Newburyport Birders at newburyportbirders@comcast.net or call 978-204-2976. Visit www.newburyportbirders.com for more information.

Parker River National Wildlife Refuge, Plum Island: Acadian Flycatcher, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, Olive-sided Flycatcher, Green-winged Teal, Red Knot, Mourning Warbler, Black-capped Warbler, Warbling Vireo, Tricolored Heron, White-rumped Sandpiper, Alder Flycatcher, Least Bittern, Eurasian Gull Iceland, Laughing Seagull.

Niles Pond at Eastern Point, Gloucester: Little Blue Heron.

Plum Island Turnpike, Newburyport/Newbury: King rail.

New Hampshire Coast: Martine, White-faced Ibis, Tricolored Heron, Northern Fulmar, Pygmy Tern, Piping Plover, American Oystercatcher, Arctic Tern, Purple Sandpiper.

Woodsom Farm, Amesbury: Great Blue Heron, European Starling, American Robin, Song Sparrow, Barn Swallow, Red-tailed Hawk, Red-winged Blackbird, Northern Mockingbird, Bobolink, Yellow Warbler, Catbird, Brown Mockingbird, Mourning Dove, Willow Flycatcher, Goldfinch Elegant Cardinal, Eastern Bluebird, White-breasted Nuthatch, Blue Jay, Meadowlark, House Sparrow, Canada Goose, Chimney Swift, Tufted Titmouse, Common Yellowthroat, Chestnut-sided Warbler, American Redstart, Northern Grosbeak Rose, House Wren, Carolina Wren, Ovenbird, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Northern Flicker, Baltimore Oriole.

Pease International Tradeport, Portsmouth, NH: Upland Sandpiper, American Kestrel, Grasshopper Sparrow.

Riverbend Conservation Area, West Newbury: Eastern Wood-pewee, Catbird, Willow Flycatcher, Crested Flycatcher, Song Sparrow, American Goldfinch, Eastern Kingbird, Black-backed Gull, Tree Swallow, Eastern Phoebe, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Rufous-bellied Woodpecker, Common Yellowthroat, Yellow Warbler, Double-crested Cormorant, Black-capped Chickadee, Crested Tit, Great Blue Heron, Grackle, Red-winged Blackbird, Downy Woodpecker, Northern Flicker, Osprey, Turkey Vulture.

Granite State Whale Watch in Rye, NH: Great Shearwater, Northern Gannet, Sooty Shearwater, Black Guillemot, Wilson’s Storm-Petrel.

Willowdale State Forest – Eastern Sector, Ipswich: Herring Gull, Mourning Dove, Black-billed Cuckoo, Chimney Swift, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Rufous-bellied Woodpecker, Downy Woodpecker, Hairy Woodpecker, Pileated Woodpecker, Eastern Wood-pewee, Eastern Phoebe, Crested Flycatcher, Vireo Yellow-throated Vireo, Warbling Vireo, Red-eyed Vireo, Blue Jay, American Crow, Black-capped Chickadee, Crested Tit, Red-breasted Nuthatch, White-breasted Nuthatch, Brown Creeper, Grey-blue Gnatcatcher, Eastern Bluebird , Veery, Hermit Thrush, Wood Thrush, American Robin, Catbird, Cedar Waxwing, Ovenbird, Gray Warbler, Black and White Warbler, Common Yellowthroat, Yellow Warbler, Pine Warbler, Chipping Sparrow, Song Sparrow, Tanager Scarlet, Cardinal Red, Baltimore Oriole, Red-winged Blackbird, Brown-headed Cowbird, Common Grackle, American Goldfinch.

Union Street, Newburyport: American Robin, Cedar Waxwing, Red-tailed Hawk, Turkey Vulture, Common Grackle, European Starling, Chimney Swift, Tree Swallow, American Goldfinch, House Sparrow.

Spencer-Peirce-Little Farm, Newbury: Killdeer, Savannah Sparrow, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Hairy Woodpecker, Downy Woodpecker, Red-tailed Hawk, Black-capped Chickadee, Crested Tit, White-breasted Nuthatch, Chipping Sparrow, Blue Jay.

Amesbury Boat Launch, Amesbury: Rough-winged Swallow, Spotted Sandpiper, Bald Eagle, Double-crested Cormorant, Barn Swallow, Tree Swallow.

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Country Diary: Suddenly I Want to Hear a Willow Warbler | Birds https://budgies-paradise.com/country-diary-suddenly-i-want-to-hear-a-willow-warbler-birds/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 04:30:00 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/country-diary-suddenly-i-want-to-hear-a-willow-warbler-birds/ OOvernight showers call for an early morning rescue mission along the riverside path, before the rush of people trampling begins. Forefingers and thumbs squeeze the snails which slide to the right and launch them into a meadow where the reed and rush warblers sing. Snails tilting their eye stalks to the left are picked up […]]]>

OOvernight showers call for an early morning rescue mission along the riverside path, before the rush of people trampling begins. Forefingers and thumbs squeeze the snails which slide to the right and launch them into a meadow where the reed and rush warblers sing. Snails tilting their eye stalks to the left are picked up and dropped on grass beds under the willows. Please don’t break. From the canopy above my hunched shoulders flows the song of blackcaps, garden warblers and warblers.

Something is missing from this chorus of warblers, if the names are to be believed. I don’t recall hearing a willow warbler among these thorny groves this year or another, although it is probably the most common warbler in Britain, and there are hundreds of willows here with welcoming branches . To the south, the sandy land on which the heathland lies seems to be the preferred nesting area for the Willow Warbler. The birch warbler might be a better name for this bird, as it thrives in the pioneer forests that arise once the conifer plantations are cleared.

I remember the first of the year at the RSPB reserve one morning in mid-April, I tuned in just when I encountered a couple walking the other way. “Can you hear that song falling?” I blurted out. “It’s a willow warbler and it just arrived from Africa.”

“The birch warbler might be a better name for this bird, as it thrives in the pioneer forests that arise once the conifer plantations are cleared.” Photography: Nature Photographers Ltd/Alamy

Today I find myself half-running towards the moor, eager to hear the warbler’s dying cadence again, perhaps to taste its melody one last time before the songbird’s spring comes. turn off. A French birding site calls the song of the willow warbler unmistakable (undoubted).

There, from a solitary birch tree overlooking the open moor, come those hesitant and stuttering first notes, similar to those of a chaffinch. And then the willow warbler’s USP: a keyboard stroke descending so rapidly in a liquid cascade that the repeated – or nearly repeated – notes are lost in what appears to be a musical free fall. He chants the phrase over and over again, with pauses of a few seconds in between. Repetition does not dull the appetite; every bit of somersault fades and I want more.

On the new moor, a denser stand of trees, the height of a giraffe’s ear, and one, two, four birds within earshot. Birch Warblers.

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Music project ‘For the Birds’ seeks to celebrate and save birdsong https://budgies-paradise.com/music-project-for-the-birds-seeks-to-celebrate-and-save-birdsong/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 16:20:27 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/music-project-for-the-birds-seeks-to-celebrate-and-save-birdsong/ At the height of the pandemic, Randall Poster found solace in birdsong. As the musical supervisor of some of Hollywood’s most prestigious directors, he is used to listening to melodies. But he hadn’t paid much attention to the music of nature. The more he noticed the birds and their songs, the more he realized that […]]]>

At the height of the pandemic, Randall Poster found solace in birdsong. As the musical supervisor of some of Hollywood’s most prestigious directors, he is used to listening to melodies. But he hadn’t paid much attention to the music of nature.

The more he noticed the birds and their songs, the more he realized that climate change threatened both. Then, a colleague, Rebecca Reagan, had an idea: Mr. Poster could invite notable musicians to create music built around the chirping of birds. The result, produced in conjunction with the National Audubon Society, is “For the Birds: The Birdsong Project.”

Why we wrote this

The beauty that surrounds us can be a source of inspiration, if we pay attention to it. A new musical project hopes to bring that kind of attention to birds and birdsong – and to the preservation of both.

Thirteen hours of music featuring a wide range of musicians, the 20-LP box set will be available in the fall. For now, the tracks are being released on streaming platforms, in the hopes that they will encourage people to listen to nature – and preserve it.

The universality of bird sounds explains why “For the Birds” encompasses so many musical styles, from minimalist composer Terry Riley, to jazz saxophonist Kamasi Washington, to hip-hop artist Wale.

“For the Birds” also includes a partnership with eyewear retailer Warby Parker for a range of inexpensive binoculars for underserved children.

“It feeds another generation … of concerned people,” says Mr. Poster. “Ultimately, I think that will be the legacy of the project.”

Randall Post spends many hours every day listening to music. It’s his job. Some of Hollywood’s most prestigious directors – Martin Scorsese, Wes Anderson, Nancy Meyers – hire him to choose the perfect songs to pair with scenes in their films, so the Music Supervisor is on a constant quest for remarkable melodies.

Then in 2020, Mr. Poster discovered something extraordinary. The New York resident heard something he had heard countless times but paid little attention to. Its emotional resonance floored the man with the golden ears.

It was the sound of birds.

Why we wrote this

The beauty that surrounds us can be a source of inspiration, if we pay attention to it. A new musical project hopes to bring that kind of attention to birds and birdsong – and to the preservation of both.

“During this dark moment of the pandemic, when we didn’t know what was in store for us, … you look out the window and nature goes on,” Mr. Poster says on a Zoom call. “I found a lot of comfort in the birds vocalizing and sort of saying, ‘We’re here. We always sing.

As Mr. Poster’s newfound interest in avian life grew, he became more aware of how climate change threatens birds. A colleague, Rebecca Reagan, had an idea: Mr. Poster could invite notable musicians to create music built around birdsong. The result, produced in conjunction with the National Audubon Society, is “For the Birds: The Birdsong Project.”

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Here’s What You Didn’t Know About BTS Member V’s Solo Songs https://budgies-paradise.com/heres-what-you-didnt-know-about-bts-member-vs-solo-songs/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 22:26:50 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/heres-what-you-didnt-know-about-bts-member-vs-solo-songs/ ” class=”lazy img-responsive” data-src=”https://www.iwmbuzz.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/heres-what-you-didnt-know-about-bts-member- vs-solo-songs-920×518.jpg” width=”920″ height=”518″ alt=”Here’s what you didn’t know about BTS member V’s solo songs” /> Kim Tae-hung, better known as V, is a member of South Korean boy band BTS. He is a singer and also a songwriter. In a recent interview, the singer revealed the stories behind some of his […]]]>
” class=”lazy img-responsive” data-src=”https://www.iwmbuzz.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/heres-what-you-didnt-know-about-bts-member- vs-solo-songs-920×518.jpg” width=”920″ height=”518″ alt=”Here’s what you didn’t know about BTS member V’s solo songs” />

Kim Tae-hung, better known as V, is a member of South Korean boy band BTS. He is a singer and also a songwriter. In a recent interview, the singer revealed the stories behind some of his most beloved solo songs.

“Winter Bear”: V’s song, “Winter Bear” released in 2019 begins with “She looks like a blue parrot / Would you come fly to me?” He used a blue parrot as a twist on the blue bird of hope. He said, “The lyrics originally said ‘blue bird’ instead of ‘blue parrot’ instead of a blue parrot. A blue bird, of course, is a symbol of hope. I tweaked the expression slightly and changed it to a parrot. A blue parrot could be a symbol of hope, its background or the moment you have it. I found something hopeful in my mind at the time, so this expression kept coming to mind.

‘Singularity’: Podgy revealed how they recorded V’s song ‘Singularity’ in the dark with the lights off, which makes the song more ‘seductive’. Podgy said, “It’s extremely difficult to groove on a song like ‘Singularity’ when the rhythm has a kind of looseness and there are so many complex parts. Above all, it had to be attractive, so we even turned off all the lights when we recorded it.

“Stigma”: His song “Stigma” is his first solo and also one of his most heartbreaking. He said, “…the youngster in ‘Stigma’ went through ‘Singularity’ and ‘Inner Child’ and grew.”

“Sweet Night”: V said of his song, “I had the title ‘Sweet Night’ before it was part of the Itaewon Class soundtrack. I was eating with one of the actors and he m happened to play the song for them. It was called “Danbam” [literally, ‘sweet night’], just like the pub in the series. It was pure luck. (laughs) The lyrics were written after the song was chosen for the soundtrack, so I put in some references to the show”.

Source: Koreaboo

Also Read: ‘So If I Get A Tattoo, I’m Scared’: Why Is It Hard For Celebrities To Get Tattoos According To BTS Member RM?

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In Bali, bird vendors are helping the endangered mynah make a comeback https://budgies-paradise.com/in-bali-bird-vendors-are-helping-the-endangered-mynah-make-a-comeback/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 07:10:00 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/in-bali-bird-vendors-are-helping-the-endangered-mynah-make-a-comeback/ Placeholder while loading article actions BABAHAN, Indonesia — Throwing flowing crests back and forth, three snow-white Bali mynas share a branch, screaming and looking around with the blue spots around their eyes catching the sunlight. Minutes later, four more join in – a sight that would have been impossible in the wild two decades ago. […]]]>
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BABAHAN, Indonesia — Throwing flowing crests back and forth, three snow-white Bali mynas share a branch, screaming and looking around with the blue spots around their eyes catching the sunlight. Minutes later, four more join in – a sight that would have been impossible in the wild two decades ago.

But working with bird breeders and sellers – the very group that has contributed to the critical endangerment of prized birds – conservationists are releasing them in the province of Bali, hoping to increase the wild population.

Experts say more research and monitoring is needed, but the conservation model has shown promise over the past 10 years and could be replicated for other vulnerable birds in Indonesia.

Endemic to Bali, the Bali mynah has been a highly sought-after collector’s item in the international cagebird trade for over a century due to its striking white plumage and song. The capture of the birds for sale, coupled with habitat loss due to land conversion to agriculture and settlements, has led to the bird being listed as “threatened” by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. in 1988 and to be classified as “critically endangered” in 1994. By 2001 experts estimated that about six Bali mynahs lived in the wild, with thousands in captivity around the world.

Recognizing the deep-rooted culture of bird breeders in Indonesia and the urgent need for conservation of the Bali mynah, the non-governmental organization now called BirdLife International partnered with the government to start a captive breeding program in the years 1980.

Breeders can apply for licenses to breed the birds. If approved, they receive mynahs from the government and are allowed to keep 90% of the offspring for private sale. The remaining birds are rehabilitated and released to West Bali National Park, where they can be monitored by park authorities.

The conservation method is compatible with Indonesian culture, where it is common to have birds in cages and people depend on the bird trade for their income, said Tom Squires, a doctoral student at Manchester Metropolitan University who is studying the ecology of the Bali mynah and other threatened birds in Indonesia.

“The national park has started to understand that and … create the conditions where you could have a wild population still thriving,” Squires said. “Ornithologists can still keep birds and follow their hobby without causing real problems for wild populations – which is, I think, much better than endangered species in the world.”

The first releases of mynahs were plagued with problems: some birds were infected with a parasite that caused high mortality in nestlings, others were killed by natural predators. Poaching also continued – and the national park’s captive breeding facility was even robbed at gunpoint, with nearly 40 birds stolen.

Still, conservation efforts over the past decade have seen greater success thanks to increased bird monitoring, stronger census data and more research, Squires said.

Agus Ngurah Krisna Kepakisan, the manager of West Bali National Park, also attributes the success of the breeding program to the creation and proliferation of “buffer villages” around the park. Villagers are being helped to obtain permits to raise Bali mynahs there.

“The community being the breeders…they help us take care of the birds that exist in the wild,” he said. “There are also those who often searched for and took the Bali mynah from the wild.”

Squires said there is definitive evidence that some released birds have produced offspring. “So that leads me to believe that the population is certainly self-sufficient to some degree,” he said.

The progress of the breeding program can be seen throughout the park, where Kepakisan says 420 Bali mynahs now live and hop in the trees, poke their heads out of nest boxes and shout at tourists passing beneath them.

Conservation efforts have extended to Tabanan Regency – a three-hour drive from the park – where mynah flies over lush rice paddies framed by mountains and forests.

The area is a recent release site for the Friends of National Parks Foundation, an Indonesia-based nonprofit that works with donors and breeders to purchase, rehabilitate and release the birds.

Veterinarian I Gede Nyoman Bayu Wirayudha, who founded the organization and has worked in Bali mynah conservation for years, said his conservation efforts focus in part on grassroots community investment in well-being. to be birds.

Traditionally, communities around conservation areas thought there was no money to be made from them, he said. But Wirayudha believes the presence of rare birds will help attract tourists, which will provide additional tourism income to the area, as is the case in other parts of Bali province where mynahs have been released.

“You have to give something back to the community so they can feel that conservation is benefiting them,” he said.

Community outreach seems to be working. When the organization released the mynahs in April, groups of students, police, military and nearby villagers watched with anticipation as the mynahs made their first flight in the wild.

Squires, the researcher, says the conservation model could be applied to other vulnerable or endangered birds in Indonesia, such as the black-winged mynah. “For all lowland birds impacted by the caged bird trade…this is the kind of approach that will be needed,” he said.

Tatan Syuflana, Associated Press photographer, contributed to this report.

The Associated Press Health and Science Department is supported by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

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