bird feeders – Budgies Paradise http://budgies-paradise.com/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 14:25:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://budgies-paradise.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-41-150x150.png bird feeders – Budgies Paradise http://budgies-paradise.com/ 32 32 Vermont Fish & Wildlife News — Waterbury Roundabout https://budgies-paradise.com/vermont-fish-wildlife-news-waterbury-roundabout/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 13:17:01 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/vermont-fish-wildlife-news-waterbury-roundabout/ Bears wake up hungry and seek out food sources they can smell like birdseed, garbage, chickens, pet food, and barbecue grills. “Preventing bears from accessing human-sourced foods, such as bird seed, is key to successful coexistence,” Comeau said. It’s also important not to deliberately feed a bear, Comeau added. It brings bears closer to you […]]]>

Bears wake up hungry and seek out food sources they can smell like birdseed, garbage, chickens, pet food, and barbecue grills.

“Preventing bears from accessing human-sourced foods, such as bird seed, is key to successful coexistence,” Comeau said.

It’s also important not to deliberately feed a bear, Comeau added. It brings bears closer to you and your neighbors, “and it’s illegal,” she said.

In addition to dismantling feeders, wildlife experts recommend storing waste in bear-proof containers or inside a structure and using electric fencing to protect chickens and bees.

For those who enjoy attracting songbirds to their property, the state will partner with Audubon Vermont to highlight feeder alternatives such as the Native Plants for Birds program.

“Birds and native plants have co-evolved together over millions of years,” said Gwendolyn Causer, communications coordinator and environmental educator for Audubon Vermont.

“Native plants provide essential food resources for birds year-round and also harbor protein-rich native butterfly and moth caterpillars, the number one food for songbird nestlings. And above all, they do not attract bears.

To help better understand bear interactions and inform coexistence measures, Vermonters are encouraged to submit reports of bears engaging in potentially dangerous behaviors such as targeting bird feeders or garbage cans, feeding on crops or livestock, or survey campgrounds or residential areas, using the Department of Fish and Wildlife website Living with Black Bears Page.

Hearings will focus on the management of deer and moose

The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department and the Vermont Fish and Wildlife Board will hold public hearings on deer and moose management for 2022 on March 21, 23, 24 and 29.

Officials will share results from Vermont’s 2021 deer hunting seasons and discuss prospects for deer hunting next fall. The public will have the opportunity to share their observations and opinions on the current state of the deer herd.

The hearings will also include a review of the proposed 2022 moose hunting seasons and provide the public with an opportunity to provide feedback on the department’s recommended 2022 moose license count. 2022 Moose Harvest Recommendation document.

Hearings all begin at 6:30 p.m. Three are in person: Monday, March 21, at Spaulding Secondary School in Barre; Wednesday, March 23, at Kehoe Conservation Camp in Castleton; Thursday, March 24, at Lake Region High School in Orléans.

The final hearing on March 29 will be online via this Microsoft Teams meeting link which will also be live on the 29th on the department home page under Upcoming Events. To participate by phone (audio only), call 802-828-7667 and use conference ID: 904 108 179#.

Further information, including recommendations on moose management, is available online under the Public Hearings Schedule at vtfishandwildlife.com. The public can also leave comments with a phone message at 802-828-7498 or an email at ANR.FWPublicComment@vermont.gov. Comments on moose management are requested by March 31 and for deer by May 14. -0191 (ATS).

State removes bald eagle, adds other species to endangered species list

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Brown Hawks are agile hunters – Waterbury Roundabout https://budgies-paradise.com/brown-hawks-are-agile-hunters-waterbury-roundabout/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 03:41:30 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/brown-hawks-are-agile-hunters-waterbury-roundabout/ One late winter day, I heard our dog barking violently from the yard. I came out to find him standing about 6 feet from a hawk that was on the ground next to our house. I grabbed the dog’s collar, brought it up, and watched the falcon through a window. It was an immature sharp-shinned […]]]>

One late winter day, I heard our dog barking violently from the yard. I came out to find him standing about 6 feet from a hawk that was on the ground next to our house. I grabbed the dog’s collar, brought it up, and watched the falcon through a window.

It was an immature sharp-shinned hawk, about a foot long, with a dark brown back, vertical streaks on its white chest, and piercing yellow eyes. The falcon had probably crashed into the house trying to catch a bird at our feeder. I thought maybe he was dizzy and would recover shortly.

Sharp-shinned hawks are North America’s smallest accipiters, a group of hawks identified by their short wings, long tails, and distinctive flight silhouette. Unlike the falcon in our garden, adult pointy-skinned falcons have slate-grey backs and horizontal orange bars on their chests. Both adults and juveniles have black bands on their long, square-tipped tails.

It can be difficult to distinguish a sharp-shinned hawk from its larger cousin, the Cooper’s hawk, which has similar coloring but a rounded tail tip. Sharp-shinned females are one-third larger than males and can approach the size of a male Cooper’s hawk.

Sharp-shinned hawks are found year-round in all but the northernmost parts of the northeast. Birds that breed in Canada and extreme northern New England winter in the southern United States and as far south as Central America, those that migrate take advantage of updrafts along ridges and may form small groups.

They are one of the most common hawks seen in fall hawk watches. Sharp-shins breed in dense forests and prefer conifers for nesting. As a forest-dependent species, they are vulnerable to intensive logging and forest fragmentation caused by development.

Author and ornithologist Arthur Cleveland Bent, writing in 1937, described the pointy-haired hawk as a “bold and dashing little hawk, the terror of all little birds”. These raptors use the element of surprise when hunting. They can fly at speeds of up to 28 miles per hour and are adept at maneuvering through thick woods. They hide in trees along forest edges, including on low perches, and ambush their prey. They fly low over open areas, hiding behind outlines, and pop up to grab a bird in the air or from a branch in their talons.

During the winter, brown hawks hunt small birds and mammals along the edges of woods and sometimes at feeders. In addition to the hawk that hit our house, I’ve seen several other sharp shins roosting in the trees near our feeder over the years. The increasing popularity of bird feeding may have increased the populations of this falcon and allowed them to winter further north than in the past. Songbirds make up 90% of the sharpshin’s diet.

They also consume mice, voles, and sometimes grasshoppers and moths and prey on the nestlings of other birds when raising their own young. Although sharp shins primarily hunt small birds, they have been known to kill larger birds. I once witnessed a prolonged interaction between a Brown Hawk and a Pileated Woodpecker. The hawk repeatedly flew over the woodpecker, which kept jumping around the tree trunk to dodge attacks. Eventually, the falcon was disturbed by an approaching human and flew away.

It turned out that the falcon in our yard was not just stunned, but also injured. A few hours after discovering it, I went out again. The hawk started hopping around our fenced yard, spreading one wing, but not the other. He appeared to have a broken wing and could not fly. I called the game warden, and he gave me the name of a local wildlife rehabilitator experienced with raptors, who managed to capture the injured falcon with a net. He skillfully cradled the bird in his arms before putting it in a pet carrier for transport.

If you keep an eye on your bird feeders and surrounding trees, you might also get a glimpse of this agile hunter.

Susan Shea is a Vermont-based naturalist, writer, and conservationist. The Outside Story is attributed to and edited by Northern Woodlands magazine and sponsored by the Wellborn Ecology Fund of the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation.

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Vermonters urged to remove bird feeders as bears come out of hibernation earlier than usual https://budgies-paradise.com/vermonters-urged-to-remove-bird-feeders-as-bears-come-out-of-hibernation-earlier-than-usual/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 23:33:02 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/vermonters-urged-to-remove-bird-feeders-as-bears-come-out-of-hibernation-earlier-than-usual/ Photo courtesy of John Hall With black bears waking up from their seasonal slumber earlier than usual, Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department officials say it’s time to put bird feeders back into hibernation. “The department recommends dismantling bird feeders and storing them until December, to avoid attracting bears,” officials said in a news release Monday. […]]]>
Photo courtesy of John Hall

With black bears waking up from their seasonal slumber earlier than usual, Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department officials say it’s time to put bird feeders back into hibernation.

“The department recommends dismantling bird feeders and storing them until December, to avoid attracting bears,” officials said in a news release Monday.

In previous years, the department has recommended Vermonters remove bird feeders by April 1.

But warmer weather expected throughout March “will spur more bears to come out of their dens,” officials said in the statement.

The department began receiving bear reports on its “Living with Black Bears” webpage on March 7.

Attracted to food by smell, bears may also be interested in garbage, open dumpsters, backyard chickens, pet food, barbecues, campsites with accessible food, and food waste, officials said. The press release included several tips on how to prevent bears from accessing food waste, including storing trash in bear-proof containers or structures – “trash cans alone are not enough” – and the request for a bear-proof dumpster from a waste hauler.

The statement also recommends feeding pets indoors as well as using an “electric fence to protect chickens and bees”.

“Preventing bears from accessing human-sourced foods, such as bird seed, is key to successful coexistence,” said Jaclyn Comeau, the ministry’s bear biologist.

Another aspect of successful coexistence with bears is not feeding them.

“Deliberately feeding a bear is not only bad for the bear, it’s also dangerous for you, it causes problems for your neighbors and it’s illegal,” Comeau said.

Putting a bird feeder in the yard doesn’t mean Vermonters have to give up connecting with birds, officials said. They suggested planting native seeds as an alternative.

Photo courtesy of Kris & Norm Senna

“Native plants provide essential food resources for birds year-round and also harbor protein-rich native butterfly and moth caterpillars, the number one food for songbird nestlings. Most importantly, they don’t attract bears,” Gwendolyn Causer, communications coordinator and environmental educator for Audubon Vermont, said in the statement.

Vermont Audubon is partnering with the department throughout this spring to promote alternatives to bird feeders.

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Game birds in the northern state: wild turkey and quail https://budgies-paradise.com/game-birds-in-the-northern-state-wild-turkey-and-quail/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 11:31:08 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/game-birds-in-the-northern-state-wild-turkey-and-quail/ Loss of natural habitat is a serious threat to wildlife. How the game birds managed to recover after the wildfires that roared and incinerated our corner of the country is a mystery, but they are thriving again in my part of paradise. Quails begin to nest in protected spaces and their distinctive cry can be […]]]>

Loss of natural habitat is a serious threat to wildlife. How the game birds managed to recover after the wildfires that roared and incinerated our corner of the country is a mystery, but they are thriving again in my part of paradise. Quails begin to nest in protected spaces and their distinctive cry can be heard in the early morning.

Another seemingly resilient bird is the California wild turkey. While renting in Chico after the campfire, I saw several turkeys on the south side of Chico. Imagine my surprise when I ran head-on into a during a drive down North Avenue a few blocks east of McManus School. It is obvious that wild turkeys are quite comfortable moving around urban areas.

“The Real Dirt” is a chronicle of various local Master Gardeners who are part of UC Butte County’s Master Gardeners.

The wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) was nearly extinct in the 1930s due to overhunting and deforestation which destroyed their natural habitat. Today, their population has increased dramatically: wild turkeys can be found throughout North America, from Canada to Mexico, and number around seven million birds. California wild turkeys now occupy approximately 18% of our state and are controlled by hunting.

While wild turkeys can be found throughout the state, Northern California is home to the largest population. The most common species seen in the Sacramento Valley foothills is the Rio Grande wild turkey, identified by the buff colored spikes on its tail.

People love or hate the presence of wild turkeys on their property. An adult turkey can weigh over twenty pounds and cause a lot of damage by perching on cars, leaving droppings on sidewalks and driveways, and rooting in vegetable and flower gardens. Turkeys are easily domesticated and adapt effortlessly to the human environment where foraging is abundant.

Since turkey eggs hatch in just 28 days, a flock of wild turkeys can appear in no time. There are strategies for humanely encouraging wild turkeys to move to a new neighborhood. Consider using motion-sensing sprinklers, removing bird feeders from areas where turkeys are feeding, removing pet kibble from an outdoor location, and letting Fido roam free in the yard. These tactics will scare the turkeys and encourage them to move on. During the breeding season, turkeys can become aggressive. It’s best to keep your distance.

The California wild turkey season opens March 26 and ends May 1. The limit is one bird per hunter per day, three per season; hunting license and upland game bird validation is required.

Fun facts:

  • Diet: Turkeys are omnivores and eat grasses, grains and berries, as well as snails, slugs, lizards, grasshoppers, caterpillars, spiders and baby rattlesnakes.
  • Average lifespan: three to five years in the wild. The oldest known wild turkey lived to be around 13 years old.
  • Threats: raccoons, foxes, bears, opossums, hawks, wild cats and humans.
  • Nocturnal habits: turkeys sleep in trees.
  • Wild turkeys can fly and they have a maximum flight speed of around 55 miles per hour. They also have strong legs and can run up to twenty-five miles per hour.
  • Adult male turkeys are called toms and females are called hens. Very young birds are poults. Juvenile males are jakes and juvenile females are jennies. A group of turkeys is called a rafter or flock.
  • The wild turkey was Benjamin Franklin’s preference for our national bird because of its protective instincts and proud attitude.

The California quail (Callipepla californica), also called the valley quail or California valley quail, is identified by the overlapping feathers above its small head that curl into a U-shaped plume. males have larger feathers than female quails. Another distinguishing characteristic is the color of their head. Female quail have brown heads, while male heads are black with white stripes. Quails are very social birds that live in broods and can be seen nodding their heads with every step as they make their way across the floor. One of their common activities is dust bathing, where they use their bellies to burrow one to two inches into the soft ground, wriggling and flapping their wings and kicking up dust. In the spring, the quail mate for the breeding season. They are serially monogamous, their bond lasting only one season.

Quails nest on the ground in a shallow depression under a shrub or other cover.

The hens usually lay a dozen eggs, which incubate in 22 or 23 days. Once hatched, the chicks start running after just an hour, socializing with their parents. A spring heat wave can endanger a chick in the nest. In an exceptionally hot season, the chicks may not survive. Chicks begin to fly at two weeks and become independent from their parents in three to four weeks. Families often come together in common broods that include at least two females, several males, and many offspring. The male quails (roosters) in the group are often not the genetic fathers of any of the offspring. During the fall season quail travel in flocks that range from 25 to 40 birds, although it is not unusual for flocks to be even larger. Companies of over 1,000 quail have been reported.

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SEAGLE: From bird feeders to pinecones and sticks | News https://budgies-paradise.com/seagle-from-bird-feeders-to-pinecones-and-sticks-news/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/seagle-from-bird-feeders-to-pinecones-and-sticks-news/ “In the heart of winter, I finally learned that there was an invincible summer within me.” – Albert Camus “If we didn’t have winter, spring wouldn’t be so nice; if we did not sometimes taste adversity, prosperity would not be so welcome. –Anne Bradstreet “Let us love winter, because it is the spring of genius. […]]]>

“In the heart of winter, I finally learned that there was an invincible summer within me.” – Albert Camus

“If we didn’t have winter, spring wouldn’t be so nice; if we did not sometimes taste adversity, prosperity would not be so welcome. –Anne Bradstreet

“Let us love winter, because it is the spring of genius. – Pietro Aretino

“Winter is on my head, but eternal spring is in my heart.” -Victor Hugo

The real winter has arrived, which reminds us that spring is only a few weeks away. As January draws to a close, some basic and simple landscape notes to follow over the next few weeks of February, weather permitting, include:

Start planning your annual and perennial planting list for spring. Also, transplant existing perennials and manage your roses by planting, pruning or moving them. Prune dead wood from all flowering and non-flowering plants. Cut the hydrangeas to 3/4 of their growth. The transplanting season continues for all potted plants.

Now, all of these activities should start around mid-February until early March, unless we experience freezing temperatures that will delay all efforts.

Bird feeders and baths: Be sure to keep your bird feeders stocked with birdseed to serve any birds that come your way. Clean out any older food left over from the bird feeder, leaving room for fresh food. Also, clean birdbaths and keep enough water in them to quench their thirst and allow them to splash around.

Bird houses: Now is the time to clean and clean your birdhouses. Replace rotten wood, repaint if necessary and check the stability of the support post. Your birds will thank you for completing this task and giving them a clean home.

Crepe Myrtles: You can propagate crape myrtles from hardwood cuttings from last year’s growth. Make the cuttings about six inches long and insert them into a dish containing a mixture of equal parts perlite and peat moss. The medium should be well drained. Cuttings should be rooted and ready to transplant into containers in early summer.

Forced blisters: Once your narcissus, crocuses and Dutch iris have finished blooming and the foliage has died, plant them outside in the landscaped garden. The chances of popping the blisters a second time are very slim.

Garden cleaning: Continue to remove trash from lawns, landscaped beds and flower areas. Any dead leaves and plants left on the ground will hinder the spring recovery of lawn grasses and perennial flowers. Remove all plant waste from the compost pile, sprinkle it with fertilizer, soak the pile and turn it once a week. The compost will be ready for use in early summer. Otherwise, properly dispose of or safely burn debris in accordance with local ordinances.

Tight: This month, sow impatiens, marigolds, scarlet sage (salvia), zinnias, verbena, speedwell, balsam and coleus in the greenhouse to be transplanted into the landscape garden after the last spring frost. Coleus, begonias and geraniums can also be grown from cuttings. Vegetables to sow now for April transplanting include eggplant, peppers and tomatoes.

Ground cover: Put your lawn mower on the highest setting and mow mondo grass and liriope later in February. This procedure will allow the plants a fresh start at the start of the new season. Apply an appropriate mulch to deter weeds and add curb appeal. When establishing new plantings, select appropriate plant materials for the host microenvironment, whether sun, shade, or a mixture.

Roses to fall: Knockout roses can be pruned in February (after the middle of the month). They can be pruned to about a foot from ground level with five to seven strong canes. New purchases are either containerized or bare root packed. Look at the rating (1, 1.5, 2) and select the one that is most favorable to you. A “1” grade has better quality than a “2” grade, but either works.

Lantana: Lantana can be pruned once the weather has passed for the season. They can be pruned about a foot from ground level and select strong supporting leaders to start the next generation of growth for the season.

Pets: Keep monitoring the weather at night and keep outdoor doghouses warm and clean or bring your pets indoors protecting them from harsh conditions. They are part of the family and their safety is most important.

Pine cones and sticks: Continue to collect all pine cones and branch debris from the lawn and landscaped beds for curb appeal. These items can be used effectively as starter wood for your burn piles and burn barrels.

Valentine’s day: Valentine’s Day is a good timing indicator to decide when to start your base pruning of roses and lantanas etc., if and only if all the harsh winter weather has passed. Otherwise, wait about a week as the intact growth will act as a buffer to protect the rest of the plant from potential cold damage.

Late February is usually the time to prune your summer-flowering trees and shrubs, such as crape myrtles and knockout roses. Just make sure any extremely cold weather is behind us. Now is not the time to prune needle conifers.

Get ready for the fast pace ahead that will expand into all your yard activities in February and March. It’s almost pruning time for many landscape plants.

Enjoy the rest of this winter season with warm clothes, a smile and enough energy to meet the needs of your lawns, landscape plants and flower beds as spring approaches. You’ll enjoy the benefits of your work throughout the seasons to come through curb appeal, area utilization and durability.

Goodbye January and hello February!

“Do everything without complaining or arguing.” – Philippians 2:14

“In all things do unto others as you would have them do unto you, for that is the summary of the Law and the prophets.” – Matthew 7:12

“Ask and it will be given to you; Seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened to you. For everyone who asks receives; he who seeks finds; and to him who knocks, the door will be opened. – Matthew 7:7-8

“If any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask God, who gives generously to all without finding fault, and it will be given to him.” – James 1:5

Dr Eddie Seagle is Sustainability Auditor, Golf Environment Organization (Scotland), Agronomist and Horticulturist, CSI: Seagle (Consulting Services International) LLC, Professor Emeritus and Honorary Alumnus (Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College), Distinguished Professor for Teaching and apprenticeship (University System of Georgia) and short-term missionary (Heritage Church, Moultrie). Address your inquiries to csi_seagle@yahoo.com.

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Pamplin Media Group – How to care for winter birds in your yard https://budgies-paradise.com/pamplin-media-group-how-to-care-for-winter-birds-in-your-yard/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 01:43:26 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/pamplin-media-group-how-to-care-for-winter-birds-in-your-yard/ Lack of greenery in winter poses challenges for non-hibernating animals The pristine white backdrop of a snowy winter day can be a wonder to behold. While fresh snow on the ground can create impressive landscapes, the absence of greenery in the midst of harsh winter poses challenges for animals that do not come out in […]]]>

Lack of greenery in winter poses challenges for non-hibernating animals

The pristine white backdrop of a snowy winter day can be a wonder to behold.

While fresh snow on the ground can create impressive landscapes, the absence of greenery in the midst of harsh winter poses challenges for animals that do not come out in winter in a state of hibernation.

Several species of birds stay in colder climates during the winter. Red-winged crossbills, snow buntings, Bohemian waxwings, evening grosbeaks and cardinals are just some of the birds you can find looking outside on a cold winter day. . Birdwatching in winter can be a rewarding pastime because, despite the cold conditions, birds tend to be easy to find in bare trees. Additionally, colder temperatures can keep many people indoors, which means neighborhoods, trails and parks can be very quiet, making it easier for those who brave the cold to see birds.

The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds says winter is hard on birds due to weather and food scarcity. In addition, birds must consume a lot of food in a short time to have the energy and body heat to survive each day. Even birds that store food in caches or have developed unique retrieval strategies to find as much food as possible can benefit from a little help in winter. Penn State Extension suggests providing a variety of foods to attract the greatest number of species. Small black oil sunflower seeds are preferred by many smaller bird species and have a high oil content that is nutritionally important to birds. Other sunflower seeds will suit blue jays and cardinals. Other popular foods include white proso millet, thistle seeds, niger seeds, and peanuts.

Consult a wild bird store, which likely sells a bird seed mix that allows you to place a variety of seeds in a single feeder. In addition to seeds, suet (made from high-quality animal fat) is crucial for birds in winter. Families can get crafty by spreading peanut butter on pine cones and sprinkling seeds on top. Hang pine cones tied to pieces of string from tree branches for homemade bird feeders.

The birds probably need a little help to survive the winter when conditions can be grim. Offering food and observing backyard visitors can be a great way to relax on winter afternoons.

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Feeding Birds During Winter – Milford-Orange Times https://budgies-paradise.com/feeding-birds-during-winter-milford-orange-times/ Wed, 08 Dec 2021 01:34:22 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/feeding-birds-during-winter-milford-orange-times/ [ad_1] By Pat DrayThe place of the garden Pat Dray. Earlier this year, a mysterious outbreak caused widespread death of songbirds in the eastern United States, leading to a recommendation to remove bird feeders. However, reports of the disease have subsided and the Audubon Company has recommended owners to resume feeding the birds. Here in […]]]>


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By Pat Dray
The place of the garden

Pat Dray.

Earlier this year, a mysterious outbreak caused widespread death of songbirds in the eastern United States, leading to a recommendation to remove bird feeders. However, reports of the disease have subsided and the Audubon Company has recommended owners to resume feeding the birds.

Here in Connecticut we have several wintering species including cardinals, goldfinches and several species of woodpeckers. If you’re an observer, you might also see some of the more unusual species, such as the American tree, white-crowned and white-throated sparrows, and black-eyed juncos. The birds you see in your garden feeders will depend on the food, water, and shelter they have.

Some birds, such as sparrows and juncos, feed on the ground and prefer their food on a tray or platform that can be placed on the ground or mounted on a pole. Others, like Cardinals, prefer hopper feeders, which have a seed storage component that releases food onto a tray when the bird lands on the release mechanism. Some ground feeders will rarely land on a raised feeder, but will easily eat seeds that have fallen to the ground from a feeder. There are many shapes and sizes of feeders out there, and they can be quite elaborate and expensive, so use your judgment on what best suits your needs.

Different species of birds also prefer different types of seeds. Finches and woodpeckers (as well as most others) will prefer sunflower seeds. The black oil sunflower seed that you’ll see offered in stores is a small seed that is high in energy and has a thin shell that makes it a favorite. Finches also prefer millet. Your choice of feeder and seed type will allow you to attract the number and types of birds you want to attract. It also means that you won’t attract unwanted birds, such as pigeons and doves, which prefer corn.

Birds also need a source of water. They prefer ground-level baths, so don’t feel pressured into purchasing a fancy pedestal-mounted birdbath. A shallow pot works just as well. You can put a few stones or branches in the water so that the birds can stand on them and drink without getting wet.

Now let’s move on to maintenance and protection issues. Please be extra vigilant about cleaning and maintenance, as the cause of songbird disease is still a mystery. However, we do know that dirty feeders can develop mold and bacteria that can make birds sick. To clean a feeder, soak it in warm water with a mild soap, scrub it, and then disinfect it by immersing it in a 10: 1 solution of bleach and water. Rinse it and dry it thoroughly.

To protect yourself, it’s important that your feeder is no more than 10 feet from shrubs or trees so birds can escape predators. There have been sightings of black bears here in Connecticut, so it’s best not to keep your feeders outside from March through November if you are in an area where bears are prevalent.

If you want a fun activity this winter, check out Cornell University’s Project Feeder Watch, where you can count and track birds and enter your data. Visit feederwatch.org for more information.

Pat Dray is a former president of the Orange Garden Club and a master gardener.

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New ‘red list’ assessment reveals more than a quarter of UK bird species are critically endangered https://budgies-paradise.com/new-red-list-assessment-reveals-more-than-a-quarter-of-uk-bird-species-are-critically-endangered/ Sun, 05 Dec 2021 06:04:25 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/new-red-list-assessment-reveals-more-than-a-quarter-of-uk-bird-species-are-critically-endangered/ [ad_1] The assessment of British birds found over a quarter are seriously endangered. Some 70 of the 245 birds assessed in the UK are on the ‘red list’ – meaning they are of greatest conservation concern due to severe declines, numbers well below historical levels or risk global extinction, according to the latest Birds of […]]]>


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The assessment of British birds found over a quarter are seriously endangered.

Some 70 of the 245 birds assessed in the UK are on the ‘red list’ – meaning they are of greatest conservation concern due to severe declines, numbers well below historical levels or risk global extinction, according to the latest Birds of Conservation Concern 5 assessment.

This update of the UK Red List of Birds, carried out by a coalition of UK’s leading bird conservation organizations, is longer than it has ever been, with a figure almost double what it was in the first overview made in 1996.

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This assessment, carried out by groups including the British Trust for Ornithology, RSPB, Wildlife Trusts and the National Trust, examines 245 species regularly found in the UK, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man and the classifies in the red, amber or green categories depending on how they are considered threatened.

RSPB CEO Beccy Speight said the assessment was “further proof that UK wildlife is in freefall and that not enough is being done to reverse the decline”.

She warned, “As with our climate, this is truly the last-ditch fair to stop and reverse the destruction of nature.

“We often know what steps we need to take to change the situation, but we need to do a lot more, quickly and at scale. “

Newly Red Listed species include Swifts, House Swallows, Ptarmigan, Purple Sandpiper, Montagu’s Harrier, and Greenfinch.

Overall, the Red List has increased by three species since the last assessment in 2015, with 11 more birds on the Red List, but six have moved to amber status and two are no longer assessed.

The amber list has grown by seven species while the green list – of the least endangered birds – has been reduced by nine species. Previous conservation bird reports have highlighted the plight of farmland, woodland and upland birds, with this report adding more farmland and upland species to the Red List.

The research director of the Game and Wildlife Conservation Trust, which conducts the Big Farmland Bird Count each year, Dr Andrew Hoodless, said: “We need to better understand the effects of climate change on some species, as well as the impacts of climate change. evolution of habitats and food availability along migratory routes and in the wintering areas of migrants from sub-Saharan Africa.

“For many Red Listed species, however, improving breeding success in the UK is vital – we can and must make real and immediate improvements to this through better engagement with farmers, UK land managers and game wardens to encourage the adoption of effective sets of conservation measures. . “

The report also shows that the status of long-distance migrants to Africa continues to deteriorate.

Swifts have gone from the amber to red list in the face of a 58 percent drop in their populations since 1995, and house swallows are joining them due to a 57 percent drop since 1969, joining other birds that migrate to sub-Saharan Africa such as cuckoos and nightingales.

Greenfinches have moved from the green list to the red list following a crash of 62% of the population since 1993 due to a serious outbreak of trichomoniasis.

Environmentalists said the disease had spread through contaminated food and drinking water, and urged owners to regularly clean bird feeders and temporarily stop distributing food if sick birds are seen so to slow down the spread.

Experts have also raised concerns about populations of waterfowl and wading birds that overwinter in the UK, such as Bewick’s Swans, Common Goldeneye and Dunlin, which have joined the Red List, with pressures such as illegal hunting abroad, ingestion of lead ammunition and climate change which sees some arctic breeding birds briefly stop in Eastern Europe rather than s’ fly to Great Britain.

Leach Oceanite and Black-legged Kittiwakes are among the Red List birds threatened with global extinction. Rook has moved from the Green List to the Amber List as it is now classified as vulnerable to extinction on a European scale.

More than 20% of the European crows population breed in the UK and Wales, their numbers decreased by 58% between 1995 and 2018.

There were also warnings about the future of curlews in Wales, with suggestions that the species could become extinct as a breeding bird in the next 12 years. Habitat loss and unfavorable habitat management are some of the reasons for the nearly 70% decline in numbers since 1995.

The Northern Wheatear is another bird that is rising to the top of the amber list. The number of highland songbirds is plummeting, which the report said has triggered a need to understand the cause of their decline.

In better news, successful reintroduction projects have helped white-tailed eagles – which have become extinct in the UK as

birds breeding over a century ago – go from red list to amber list.

Song Thrush, Pied Flycatcher, and Spring Wagtail have changed from red to amber, although they remain close to the threshold of the most at-risk category, as have Red Wing and Black Redstart.

The colonization of the UK by new birds – in large part due to human-induced climate change – saw five new species, including the great white egret, the cattle egret and the black-winged stilt added to the last review.

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Bringing Peace to Veterans Memorial Park, One Bird at a Time | Local News https://budgies-paradise.com/bringing-peace-to-veterans-memorial-park-one-bird-at-a-time-local-news/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/bringing-peace-to-veterans-memorial-park-one-bird-at-a-time-local-news/ [ad_1] American Legion Post 2 seeks to bring a sense of peace to Veterans Memorial Park in Earlington. The project, known as Project Songbird, started in fall 2020 and is still an ongoing effort. It all started with cleaning up the park, repainting the flagpoles, cleaning up trash, debris and weeds, and creating a rose […]]]>


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American Legion Post 2 seeks to bring a sense of peace to Veterans Memorial Park in Earlington. The project, known as Project Songbird, started in fall 2020 and is still an ongoing effort. It all started with cleaning up the park, repainting the flagpoles, cleaning up trash, debris and weeds, and creating a rose garden, complete with roses, chrysanthemums and sweet potato vines.

“The condition of the park was horrible. It was absolutely embarrassing. We knew we had to do something to clean it up, ”Spencer Brewer, commanding officer of the Sons of American Legion Post 2 at Earlington.

Once the park had been cleaned up, with a new flower garden and freshly painted flag poles, the idea came to bring in birds. Feeders were therefore erected and placed in the park last summer, with the aim of bringing in butterflies and hummingbirds, which was a success.

With this seasonal success in mind, the Legion wanted to continue expanding the area and decided to try and attract songbirds. Additional traditional bird feeders were placed throughout the park, filled with birdseed, and of course songbirds came to enjoy the feeders. Blue jays, cardinals and domestic finches now frequent feeders and about every three days the feeders are completely empty.

“We relied on the expertise of Erica Wood, a horticultural specialist in Hopkins County. She advised us how to set up the gardens and what to plant.

If you are interested in volunteering with this ongoing project, please contact Spencer Brewer, 270-754-9317. If you would like to donate in the form of bird feeders or bird seed, please visit Ann Gipson at 207 E. Main Street, Earlington. For all monetary donations, please send direct to American Legion Post 2, PO Box 233, Earlington, KY 42410.

Updates to the Veterans Memorial Park are meant to bring peace and comfort to those who have served our country. Everyone’s efforts to revitalize the park are appreciated and do not go unnoticed. It is now a place the City of Earlington can be proud of.

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KimsKorner: November is the time to enjoy together https://budgies-paradise.com/kimskorner-november-is-the-time-to-enjoy-together/ Sun, 31 Oct 2021 16:30:26 +0000 https://budgies-paradise.com/kimskorner-november-is-the-time-to-enjoy-together/ [ad_1] As we have now started November I wanted to find more things to do than do and today’s column has a combination of the two. November is a good month to try and spend some time with your family between sports. Hope you can find the time to do things with your family and […]]]>


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As we have now started November I wanted to find more things to do than do and today’s column has a combination of the two. November is a good month to try and spend some time with your family between sports. Hope you can find the time to do things with your family and / or friends.

On this first site, I loved the idea of ​​the suitcase, you will have to try this one. https://www.realsimple.com/work-life/entertainment/fun-things-to-do-november

Flip through magazines or grocery store ads and cut out Thanksgiving-related foods. Then glue it onto a paper plate to create a fake Thanksgiving dinner!

Write thank you notes to people in your world (pastors, teachers, neighbors, etc.).

Take out a suitcase and have the children pretend to pretend they are traveling on the Mayflower – what would they take with them?

Make simple bird feeders – roll pine cones in peanut butter, then bird seed. Hang on a tree branch with wire

Another place I found some cool things to do https://happyhomefairy.com/easy-activities-for-family-fun-this-november

Write down what you are grateful for -As a family, write a list of the things for which you are grateful. Not only will this put you and your children in the mood for Thanksgiving, but it will be a sweet reminder to practice gratitude. I saw a suggestion like this to use post-it notes and hang them around the house for others to see.

Roast Marshmallows – Whether you’re warm and toasty by the fireplace inside or bundled up by a fire pit in the backyard, your kids will love roasting their own marshmallows and making s’mores as a special November treat .

Play a Touch Soccer Game – Make the most of the time before it gets really too cold to play outdoors with a Touch Soccer game with your home or group of friends / family. Head to a local park or grab a game in someone’s backyard for the afternoon, then head inside afterward for a hot chocolate.

Take a Bike Ride – Get out there and enjoy the fresh air with your kids before the real cold of winter. Take a walk.

Bake Cookies -Do you need to say more? Baking cookies is never a bad idea, especially with the holidays just around the corner. Refine your Christmas cookie game by trying out new recipes, decorating cookies with the kids, or just baking for fun.

Build a Scarecrow – Build a scarecrow out of hay and / or old newspaper for stuffing, and for outfit, dig up old clothes and accessories lying around your house.

Build a fort – Don’t want to sleep outside? Build a fort inside using chairs, pillows, and blankets.

30 Perfect Family Bonding Activities in November

Create differently decorated apples. Pour sprinkles or sprinkles on a small dish or plate. Provide a small bowl of glue. Let your child paint a thin layer of glue on an apple that you have drawn and cut out or some printed and cut apples, and put glitter / or the like in place.

Crafty Critters – Lois Ehlert’s beloved children’s book, Leaf Man, is the fall inspiration behind these creative little creatures. Your little artist can use fall leaves to create almost any type of fall friend she can imagine. (See sample photo)

The next good things I also found on https://tinybeans.com/things-to-do-as-family-in-november

November 3 is sandwich day. Make sandwiches with the family and enjoy them or make it a game and see who makes the best sandwich.

In November, collect change and take it to your favorite charity on Giving Tuesday. GivingTuesday is November 30, 2021 and is a great way to teach your kids how to give, whether it’s the time, gifts like toys and clothes to those in need, or the loose change your family collects for. donate on the 30th to your favorite charity.

GivingTuesday is a global generosity movement that unleashes the power of radical generosity. GivingTuesday was created in 2012 with a simple idea: a day that encourages people to do good. Since then, it has grown into a permanent global movement that inspires hundreds of millions of people to give, collaborate and celebrate generosity.

It’s a simple idea: whether it’s making someone smile, helping a neighbor or stranger, showing up for a problem or people we care about, or giving a part of what we have for those who need our help, every act of generosity counts and everyone has something to give.

Finally I like this one to spend time with your kids young and old before it gets too cold outside have a great time Nature walk with family or friends or both. https://www.firefliesandmudpies.com/5-tricks-for-enjoyable-nature-walks-with-children-

What should I bring on a Nature Walk?

When you go on a nature walk with the kids, dress everyone for the weather! It is also useful to have:

Closed shoes

Backpack

Bottles of water

Insect repellent and / or sunscreen

Healthy snacks

Travel first aid kit

Tip: Keep a change of clothes and a towel in the car in case your kids decide to play in mud or water!

Tips for Family Walking in Nature – In my twenties, I worked for the local YMCA camp as an outdoor educator. Leading groups of children and adults on nature walks was a big part of my working day. Let me tell you, there is nothing more exciting than seeing a child’s eyes widen at the sight of a deer or seeing him catch a toad for the very first time!

So put on these closed-toe shoes and grab your favorite water bottle!

Invite your child to lead

For the sake of supervision, I prefer children to walk in front of me rather than behind me. Most importantly, letting kids lead a nature walk builds their self-confidence and decision-making abilities while satisfying their innate curiosity.

Children have so much to see, touch, smell and discover on a nature walk!

Of course, you might not get very far walking with a little one… but that’s okay! Let your child set the pace and avoid rushing him.

Start a Nature collection

Bring a bag and invite your child to start a nature collection by collecting interesting objects that have fallen to the ground. Pine cones, bark, leaves, sticks, small stones, and seeds can all be saved and used for nature crafts.

You can store nature’s collections in a basket outside on the porch.

Tip: Provide kid-friendly magnifying glasses, plastic tweezers, and field guides so kids can examine and identify their treasures.

Practice Mindful Listening – There is satisfaction in listening to the not-so-quiet sounds of the forest. Mindful listening is about being fully present and aware of yourself and the sounds around you. Through careful listening, children will notice and feel gratitude for the sounds of wind, birds, streams, leaves and crackling twigs.

Give it a try: invite your child to close their eyes, lean their face towards the sun, and listen to the sounds of nature. What do they hear?

Say yes to mud – kids and clothes are so washable! And a little dirt helps boost a child’s immune system.

Bring Your Camera – Pictures of children in nature are incredibly touching and you won’t want to forget those moments with your family

Things to look for on a nature walk

There is so much to see and discover in the open air!

1. Plants

Deciduous trees

evergreen trees

Sheets

Flowers

Buds

Foams

The sticks

pine needles

Fruits, such as apples, papaya, blueberries and black raspberries

Edible plants, such as cattails, wild garlic, and dandelions

Aromatic plants, such as wintergreen

To bark

Sap

2. Seeds and nuts

Tassels

cones

Nuts

Chestnuts

Maple keys (helicopters)

Milkweed pods

3. Mushrooms

Plateau mushrooms

Mushrooms

Mud molds

Lichens

4. Animals

Mammals, such as squirrels and deer

Birds, like hawks and woodpeckers

Reptiles, such as turtles and snakes

Amphibians, such as frogs and salamanders

Insects, such as fireflies, ladybugs, and mantises

Crustaceans, such as crayfish and bedbugs

5. Animal evidence

Nests, like a bird and a squirrel

Cracked seeds or shells

Nibbled leaves (leaves with holes)

spiderweb

Shells

Exoskeletons

Faeces (faeces of wild animals)

Feathers

BONE

dens

Burrows

Tunnels

Anthills

Eggs

Peak holes

Snake skin

Fur

Animal tracks

Cocoons and pupae

beaver lodges

Hornet hives and nests (dead, please)

6. Evidence from humans

Trails and / or roads

Trail markers

Stone cairns

Carved trees

Fingerprints

Vehicle tracks

Litter (pick up and throw away)

Geocaches or mailboxes

Buildings

Fairy houses

Notched maples

Hunting and / or bird blinds

Bird feeders

Bird houses

Bat houses

Bridges

Shelters, forts and forts in the trees

Docks

Arrowheads

Rocks and minerals

Fossils

Concretions

Sand

Clay

Landforms, such as mountains

Rivers, streams, streams and sources of fresh water

8. Additional ideas

Rotten logs

Ice cream and / or ice cubes

Snow

Rain

Mud

Spring pools

Gel

Flasks of water

dew drops

Sunsets and / or sunrises

Enjoy these special moments with your children, especially the older ones, while they continue to do things with the family.

* Let me know your ideas or what you would like to see and I will take care of it for you. Email me at kjenkins@aimmediamidwest.com

Remember to be kind and love each other and continue to set a good example for our children. See you next week with some new ideas and ways to help your kids, or ideas that might help you raise your kids in some way. God bless you all.

There are so many clever creatures for your kids to do like this leaf pig. Just ask them to use their imaginations.

Find all kinds of things when you and your family or others take a nature walk.

Join Kimberly Jenkins (740)353-3101 ext. 1928

© 2021 Portsmouth Daily Times, all rights

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